Thread: When Did It Become Politically Incorrect To Say A Woman Is Beautiful?

robslob - 12/29/2016 at 11:29 PM

http://www.nydailynews.com/entertainment/gossip/steve-martin-tribute-carrie -fisher-deemed-sexist-article-1.2927692

"When I was a young man, Carrie Fisher was the most beautiful creature I had ever seen. She turned out to be witty and bright as well." -Steve Martin

In 2016, that is interpreted as a sexist and inappropriate remark.

I'm sorry folks, but I have a BIG problem in how far this PC world we live in has gone.

Can you REALLY imagine an uproar if some woman said, "When I was a young woman, Muhammad Ali was the most handsome creature I had ever seen. He turned out to be witty and bright as well."

Look people, I'm just as much a feminism supporter as anyone. PLEASE...........tell me, tell me, tell me.............when did it become UN-Politically Correct to say that a woman is beautiful???

Interested in commentary, be you male, female, black, white, gay, straight, whatever.


[Edited on 12/29/2016 by robslob]


BrerRabbit - 12/29/2016 at 11:53 PM

It isn't incorrect at all. However in the modern world it is important to acknowledge attributes that matter first.


Muleman1994 - 12/30/2016 at 12:11 AM

The PC crowd would call it sexist.
Everything must be labeled so that the person complimenting the woman can be attacked.


PhotoRon286 - 12/30/2016 at 01:03 AM

quote:
The PC crowd would call it sexist.
Everything must be labeled so that the person complimenting the woman can be attacked.



You are an idiot and prove it with every post.


Muleman1994 - 12/30/2016 at 01:37 AM

quote:
quote:
The PC crowd would call it sexist.
Everything must be labeled so that the person complimenting the woman can be attacked.



You are an idiot and prove it with every post.

___________________________________________________________________________ ______________

There's always barber college son.


BIGV - 12/30/2016 at 02:36 AM

quote:
I'm sorry folks, but I have a BIG problem in how far this PC world we live in has gone.


Almost as bad was Steve Martin's deleting his heartfelt comment.....

Can not wait for "PC" to go the way of HC


BrerRabbit - 12/30/2016 at 02:59 AM

quote:
The PC crowd would call it sexist.




Swifty - 12/30/2016 at 03:17 AM

quote:
The PC crowd would call it sexist.
Everything must be labeled so that the person complimenting the woman can be attacked.



You label liberals all the time. You may think this is truthful but it is labeling.

Did you ever find out if the rich people you admire have any chance of getting into heaven? If the answer is no does this disqualify their followers as well?

I'm not Christian but I am curious how Christians feel about the obvious conflict between what they believe and how they behave.


Swifty - 12/30/2016 at 03:22 AM

I don't think there is anything wrong with this quote. Steve Martin may have seen her on screen and thought she was really beautiful and then met her later and was impressed with these other qualities. With a tweet you only have 140 or so characters and there is no space for context.


BIGV - 12/30/2016 at 03:45 AM

quote:
I don't think there is anything wrong with this quote.


I'm guessing he felt some/a lot of pressure from Hollywood about it, why else would he have deleted it?

It had to have come from his heart. Since when is that discriminatory?


robslob - 12/30/2016 at 04:05 AM

quote:

The PC crowd would call it sexist.
Everything must be labeled so that the person complimenting the woman can be attacked.


I'll go out on a limb and say that Muleman may actually have made the most spot on comment in this thread.


heineken515 - 12/30/2016 at 01:58 PM

Strictly my opinion as a 54 year old white male:

I think this subject is a generational one, in that - over time and generations, it will change.

I know women, maybe on the upper scale of age, that really appreciate and are totally flattered when you say they look great - commenting on a hair change or clothing or losing weight or whatever the case may be. Some women LOVE that sort of compliment, even strangers.

But I think men have to consider who they are about to give that sort of compliment to, as not all women are receptive to this kind of comment.

I also know women who take into consideration whom is giving them that compliment.

I work in a corporation where we have had "harassment in the workplace" classes left and right. There are some women who are just waiting for an inappropriate comment to be made, but there are other women who say to themselves, "that guy is so old school, bless his heart, he doesn't even know that could be considered harassment because he is from another generation where that sort of comment was acceptable, so I will just smile, take it as a compliment and go on."

I'm not justifying bad behavior, I am just observing what I have experienced.

I feel sorry for Steve Martin in a tiny way, he should have known not to broadcast his feelings out to the world, but his comments were probably genuine and not meant to be hurtful in any way.

This is the world we live in, if you want the Twitter world to know your feelings, you best be prepared to be attacked.

Again, strictly my opinion - but if a women is so sensitive about this subject, she is not a woman I need to be around much anyhow.


kevdab - 12/30/2016 at 03:07 PM

Sounds to me that Steve Martin was paying her a nice compliment. If that's not PC enough,then who cares. Heineken is correct that you must know the situations when giving compliments to women. Most women I know like getting complimented for their appearance, But I'm 58 and a little old school, what do I know.


CanadianMule - 12/30/2016 at 03:41 PM

quote:
quote:
I'm sorry folks, but I have a BIG problem in how far this PC world we live in has gone.


Almost as bad was Steve Martin's deleting his heartfelt comment.....

Can not wait for "PC" to go the way of HC


I agree. He should not have deleted it but I guess he didn't want to take the attention off of her passing. I don't think it was deleted because of pressure as I don't think Steve would care about that.

He was also going for a touch of humor as he (and she) are/were comedians. God forbid that anyone smile anymore - it may offend someone.

The truth is that if he had switched the order and said that she was witty, bright and beautiful then no one would have had a problem. The world is nuts and far too many people pay attention to what bothers a minority who post on the internet all day long.


porkchopbob - 12/30/2016 at 04:01 PM

We live in an age of incredulousness - everyone has to be upset about something. Politicians tap into it to drive their campaigns and inflame latent anger. Local news reporters lead people on the street every time they ask them "aren't you angry about this issue?" just so they can get an angry soundbite.

Unfortunately we also live in an age where social media interactions make the news since the internet is the easiest place to spew anger without real consequences. The reactions of a few dorks with keyboards on twitter isn't news. But people read it and the incredulousness ripple expands. If you ignore the trolls, they will go back under their bridge.


heineken515 - 12/30/2016 at 04:10 PM

quote:
Unfortunately we also live in an age where social media interactions make the news since the internet is the easiest place to spew anger without real consequences. The reactions of a few dorks with keyboards on twitter isn't news. But people read it and the incredulousness ripple expands. If you ignore the trolls, they will go back under their bridge.


I'd like to believe that if they were ignored, they would go away, but I don't.

I read a lot of news sites as I am sure you all do too and one of the things that has me shaking my head is that there will be a story, a headline, a link - and when you click on it to read it, it is simply a couple of twitter posts.

Old school news types have to be just in disbelief over what constitutes news these days.


porkchopbob - 12/30/2016 at 04:24 PM

quote:
I'd like to believe that if they were ignored, they would go away, but I don't.

I read a lot of news sites as I am sure you all do too and one of the things that has me shaking my head is that there will be a story, a headline, a link - and when you click on it to read it, it is simply a couple of twitter posts.

Old school news types have to be just in disbelief over what constitutes news these days.


If no one is reading or paying attention, then do they exist? Attention is the reaction they are seeking, so ignoring it will typically make it go away. But the loudest and dumbest often get the most attention when it comes to social media, because people like to feel incredulous and feel empowered by being angry and idiots - it's low hanging fruit.

I always laugh when newsreaders start reading twitter posts as if they are news - if I wanted to know my neighbors' opinions about Kim Kardashian, I would have asked them, thank you.


robslob - 12/30/2016 at 04:36 PM

quote:

Again, strictly my opinion - but if a women is so sensitive about this subject, she is not a woman I need to be around much anyhow.


I agree 100% with that statement.

I'll be 62 in one week, never been married, and have dated a TON. In 45 years of dating I've learned one thing and learned it well. There's a REAL simple trick to make the date go well: When you first see her, compliment her on her appearance in some way. Think, guys, about all the pressure and competition women are under to look good in U.S. society. They go to a LOT of trouble, a LOT of worry and fuss, more than we can ever really imagine, to look good. And if she's spending a day or evening with YOU, then she thinks you're worthy in some way of all that worry and fuss. To not even acknowledge that she is winning that battle, to me, would be somewhat cold.

Look, I'm not saying be superficial and insincere. You liked her enough to spend some time with her, too, this is not a one way street. But take my advice (most here would already know it) and get the appearance compliments out of the way first. Then when you actually get down to the real grits of the date itself, getting to know each other better, things will go much more smoothly. It's just common courtesy as much as anything else, after a female went to so much trouble to look good, not just for you but for the world, to tell her that all that effort was successful.

And as heineken515 said, if she is offended by that, she's not a woman I need to be spending much time with. I may be an old man, but I've never had such compliments received with anything other than appreciation.


BrerRabbit - 12/30/2016 at 05:10 PM



Lol well I guess you wouldn't have wanted to hang around Carrie Fisher!


Carrie Fisher’s Most Empowering and Inspiring Quotes
By Samantha Cooney
Dec. 28, 2016
The iconic star was also a staunch feminist

Carrie Fisher, who died on Tuesday at age 60, may be best remembered for her role as Princess Leia in the Star Wars franchise, but the actress was also known for speaking her mind — especially when it came to issues of gender equality in Hollywood.

Here are some of Fisher’s most feminist and empowering quotes.

On her legacy for playing the strong Princess Leia:

“From the first film [Star Wars], she was just a soldier, front line and center. The only way they knew to make the character strong was to make her angry. In Return of the Jedi, she gets to be more feminine, more supportive, more affectionate. But let’s not forget that these movies are basically boys’ fantasies. So the other way they made her more female in this one was to have her take off her clothes.” — In an interview with Rolling Stone in 1983

“If it was a bad thing, I would have a bad life. It’s actually great. Those movies are great. I got to be the only girl in an all boy fantasy, and it’s a great role for women. She’s a very proactive character and gets the job done. So if you’re going to get typecast as something, that might as well be it for me.” — In an interview with CBC in September 2016

On sexism in Hollywood:

“You should fight for your outfit. Don’t be a slave like I was.” — To Star Wars: The Force Awakens star Daisy Ridley about avoiding being sexualized in Hollywood in Interview magazine in 2015

“The crew was mostly men. That’s how it was and that’s pretty much how it still is. It’s a man’s world and show business is a man’s meal, with women generously sprinkled through it like overqualified spice.” — In her 2016 book The Princess Diarist

“I’m a female in Hollywood over the age of, let’s say 40, and then, we could also say 50… You don’t have to ask yourself if you want to work at that age.” — In an interview with Good Morning America in 2015

“Even in space, there’s a double standard.” — In a 2016 interview with Stephen Colbert about why Princess Leia never had a lightsaber

Read More: Why Carrie Fisher’s Princess Leia Was So Revolutionary

On her appearance:

“It’s an appearance-driven thing. I’m in a business where the only thing that matters is weight and appearance. That is so messed up. They might as well say get younger, because that’s how easy it is.” — In an interview for Good Housekeeping‘s January 2016 issue

“What I didn’t realize, back when I was this 25-year-old pinup for geeks… was that I had signed an invisible contract to stay looking the exact same way for the next 30 to 40 years. Well, clearly I’ve broken that contract.” — In her 2011 book Shokaholic, via the Huffington Post

“We treat beauty like an accomplishment, and that is insane. Everyone in LA says, “Oh you look good,” and you listen for them to say you’ve lost weight. It’s never “How are you?” or “You seem happy!”’ — In an interview for Good Housekeeping‘s January 2016 issue


Muleman1994 - 12/30/2016 at 05:19 PM

I was born and raised in The South where we use good manners.
Noting that a woman is beautiful is a complement.

We also use Yes Ma’am, Yes Sir, Thank you and God Bless You.
Those are terms of respect.

I have never seen it happen in The South but in Net York City I once held a door open for a lady and she ripped into me to being a chauvinist. And some people wonder where attitudes come from?

I guess much comes from how you were raised.


BrerRabbit - 12/30/2016 at 05:41 PM

Uh-huh and you hate Carrie Fisher types.


porkchopbob - 12/30/2016 at 05:52 PM

quote:
I was born and raised in The South where we use good manners.
Noting that a woman is beautiful is a complement.

We also use Yes Ma’am, Yes Sir, Thank you and God Bless You.
Those are terms of respect.

I have never seen it happen in The South but in Net York City I once held a door open for a lady and she ripped into me to being a chauvinist. And some people wonder where attitudes come from?

I guess much comes from how you were raised.



Eh, there are rude people everywhere, you just happened to run into a crank (or maybe you referred to her as "son"?). People like to lump NYCers into one basket, but I found people there to be nicer and more honest than any other city in the country (unless I was in the Upper East Side). But when your city is full of zombie tourists everyday, you don't have time to suffer fools on your way from the subway to work.


heineken515 - 12/30/2016 at 05:54 PM

quote:
“We treat beauty like an accomplishment, and that is insane. Everyone in LA says, “Oh you look good,” and you listen for them to say you’ve lost weight. It’s never “How are you?” or “You seem happy!”’ — In an interview for Good Housekeeping‘s January 2016 issue


I probably agree with this quote of hers.

But, in context - her point of view on all this is LA, Hollywood, stardom, which was her life, not many of ours I dare say.


robslob - 12/30/2016 at 06:01 PM

quote:

Lol well I guess you wouldn't have wanted to hang around Carrie Fisher!


I bet Paul Simon told her repeatedly that she looked good and I bet she loved it.

Now how she'd respond to a nobody like me...........???


BrerRabbit - 12/30/2016 at 06:12 PM

Hahaha- Im sure she'd swoon dead away for you robslob! Although that was pretty sexist to say you dated a TON, it isn't PC to refer to a woman by her weight.


BoytonBrother - 12/30/2016 at 07:14 PM

Robslob, The criticism reported in the media about his tweet, is not about calling her beautiful. It was more about his implication of being surprised, that a beautiful woman can also be smart and witty. It was a ball-busting and I think the public is ridiculous for being offended by this, since it is obviously a joke and he admired her very much. I think he's only guilty of bad timing.


emr - 12/30/2016 at 07:30 PM

So ridiculouse; he just gave the order of his discovery. He never indicated surprise or wonderment or disdain.

Thank god there was no p##y grabbing involved. Then we'd really have trouble


Muleman1994 - 12/30/2016 at 07:57 PM

quote:
quote:
I was born and raised in The South where we use good manners.
Noting that a woman is beautiful is a complement.

We also use Yes Ma’am, Yes Sir, Thank you and God Bless You.
Those are terms of respect.

I have never seen it happen in The South but in Net York City I once held a door open for a lady and she ripped into me to being a chauvinist. And some people wonder where attitudes come from?

I guess much comes from how you were raised.



Eh, there are rude people everywhere, you just happened to run into a crank (or maybe you referred to her as "son"?). People like to lump NYCers into one basket, but I found people there to be nicer and more honest than any other city in the country (unless I was in the Upper East Side). But when your city is full of zombie tourists everyday, you don't have time to suffer fools on your way from the subway to work.

___________________________________________________________________________ ___________

I did not lump NYCers into any basket. That is your ignorant assumption.
I was simply stating an example that there are some who lack manners.

BTW - those "zombie tourists" help keep NYC alive by spending money and getting heavily taxed.




BIGV - 12/30/2016 at 08:05 PM

quote:
This is the world we live in, if you want the Twitter world to know your feelings, you best be prepared to be attacked.


"Attacked"!..... What ever happened to being taken at your word?...Has the PC crowd forgotten about intent?.....If I approach a Co-Worker or a friend and utter the phrase, "You look nice"...that,...is exactly what I meant....No more, no less.

If I approach a stranger during the mid days of December and say "Merry Christmas"....I have taken absolutely nothing into consideration but, "I wish you the best in this magical time"....No matter your color, race or Religious leanings. My intent is to bestow you with positive energy...If you take it any other way, that is your issue, not mine.

Political correctness be damned.....Say what you feel and if you are cruel or vicious in doing so, well you've everything coming you deserve, you asked for it.


porkchopbob - 12/30/2016 at 08:08 PM

quote:
quote:
quote:
I was born and raised in The South where we use good manners.
Noting that a woman is beautiful is a complement.

We also use Yes Ma’am, Yes Sir, Thank you and God Bless You.
Those are terms of respect.

I have never seen it happen in The South but in Net York City I once held a door open for a lady and she ripped into me to being a chauvinist. And some people wonder where attitudes come from?

I guess much comes from how you were raised.



Eh, there are rude people everywhere, you just happened to run into a crank (or maybe you referred to her as "son"?). People like to lump NYCers into one basket, but I found people there to be nicer and more honest than any other city in the country (unless I was in the Upper East Side). But when your city is full of zombie tourists everyday, you don't have time to suffer fools on your way from the subway to work.

___________________________________________________________________________ ___________

I did not lump NYCers into any basket. That is your ignorant assumption.
I was simply stating an example that there are some who lack manners.

BTW - those "zombie tourists" help keep NYC alive by spending money and getting heavily taxed.



Whoa, calm down, Mr Sensitive! I never said you did, just commenting on many peoples' perceptions of the "Rude NYer". After living in NYC for over 11 years I am fully aware of the economic importance of tourism and would be happy to tell you all about NYC economics in another thread. Take a chill pill. Again, my point, people are eager to be incredulous.


Muleman1994 - 12/30/2016 at 10:08 PM

quote:
quote:
quote:
quote:
I was born and raised in The South where we use good manners.
Noting that a woman is beautiful is a complement.

We also use Yes Ma’am, Yes Sir, Thank you and God Bless You.
Those are terms of respect.

I have never seen it happen in The South but in Net York City I once held a door open for a lady and she ripped into me to being a chauvinist. And some people wonder where attitudes come from?

I guess much comes from how you were raised.



Eh, there are rude people everywhere, you just happened to run into a crank (or maybe you referred to her as "son"?). People like to lump NYCers into one basket, but I found people there to be nicer and more honest than any other city in the country (unless I was in the Upper East Side). But when your city is full of zombie tourists everyday, you don't have time to suffer fools on your way from the subway to work.

___________________________________________________________________________ ___________

I did not lump NYCers into any basket. That is your ignorant assumption.
I was simply stating an example that there are some who lack manners.

BTW - those "zombie tourists" help keep NYC alive by spending money and getting heavily taxed.



Whoa, calm down, Mr Sensitive! I never said you did, just commenting on many peoples' perceptions of the "Rude NYer". After living in NYC for over 11 years I am fully aware of the economic importance of tourism and would be happy to tell you all about NYC economics in another thread. Take a chill pill. Again, my point, people are eager to be incredulous.

___________________________________________________________________________ _________

"people are eager to be incredulous"
Yes you do seem to have your panties in a twist.


Bhawk - 12/31/2016 at 03:07 AM

Looks like someone at New York Magazine had no clue about Steve Martin's sense of humor.


robslob - 12/31/2016 at 06:18 AM

quote:

Looks like someone at New York Magazine had no clue about Steve Martin's sense of humor.


You know, I hadn't thought about Martin's remark in that light at all. But now that you mention it.........yeah, it's actually very funny.

And that really supports my whole point in starting this thread: This PC stuff has become SO godd*mn serious, it takes a lot of the fun out of much of life.


BrerRabbit - 12/31/2016 at 07:00 AM

I think bhawk nailed it.
That Steve Martin humor angle occured to me as well, and I can see why he just deleted it, these guys are pro comics and are used to stuff just going over peoples' heads or falling flat. Snare roll and cymbal. I'm sure it bothered him less than the masses of twits.


gina - 1/5/2017 at 12:47 AM

People just need to be who and what they are. Some have more desirable outward physical characteristics that make people see that as their beauty, and they are right, that is a form of beauty. Naturally beautiful women are scorned and hated by other women who are jealous of them. The enviers ought to just work on their inner selves and be the best they can be, cause if you are beautiful, your light will shine and come thru and the world will know it. Do the best with what you were given. As a wise man said "Let Your Soul Shine"!


jszfunk - 1/7/2017 at 02:46 PM

quote:
quote:
The PC crowd would call it sexist.
Everything must be labeled so that the person complimenting the woman can be attacked.



You label liberals all the time. You may think this is truthful but it is labeling.

Did you ever find out if the rich people you admire have any chance of getting into heaven? If the answer is no does this disqualify their followers as well?

I'm not Christian but I am curious how Christians feel about the obvious conflict between what they believe and how they behave.


How do you know there is a conflict between how they believe and behave?

[Edited on 1/7/2017 by jszfunk]


jszfunk - 1/7/2017 at 02:46 PM

quote:
We live in an age of incredulousness - everyone has to be upset about something. Politicians tap into it to drive their campaigns and inflame latent anger. Local news reporters lead people on the street every time they ask them "aren't you angry about this issue?" just so they can get an angry soundbite.

Unfortunately we also live in an age where social media interactions make the news since the internet is the easiest place to spew anger without real consequences. The reactions of a few dorks with keyboards on twitter isn't news. But people read it and the incredulousness ripple expands. If you ignore the trolls, they will go back under their bridge.


AMEN!


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