Don't click or your IP will be banned


Hittin' The Web with the Allman Brothers Band Forum
You are not logged in

< Last Thread   Next Thread >Ascending sortDescending sorting  
Author: Subject: Ford to import Focus from China in 2019!

Maximum Peach





Posts: 9658
(9683 all sites)
Registered: 4/27/2003
Status: Offline

  posted on 6/20/2017 at 09:53 AM
The Focus is currently built in Wayne Michigan.

It had been scheduled to be assembled in 2018 at the new plant they were constructing in San Luis Potosi Mexico, but work that plant was stopped. Ford then announced they would instead build it at an existing Hermosillo plant also in 2018.

Today they announce that they will not be building the Focus in Mexico for the US market and instead will up production at an existing plant in China for export to the US in 2019.

quote:
DETROIT (AP) -- Ford Motor Co. will export vehicles from China to the U.S. for the first time starting in 2019.

Ford said Tuesday it plans to move production of its Ford Focus small car from the U.S. to China, where it already makes the Focus for Chinese buyers.

Sales of small cars have dropped sharply in the U.S. and companies are seeking to cut costs making them. Ford's president of global operations Joe Hinrichs said the move to China will save the company $1 billion, including $500 million for canceling plans to build the Focus in Mexico.

Wary of the response from President Donald Trump, who has criticized Ford for making vehicles outside the U.S., Ford said the move won't cost U.S. jobs. The suburban Detroit plant that currently makes the Focus will be converted late next year to produce the Ford Ranger pickup and Ford Bronco SUV.

Hinrichs said Ford's research shows that customers — who are used to phones and other gadgets from China — care more about product quality than where their vehicles are made.

Ford also said Tuesday that it plans to invest $900 million in its Kentucky Truck Plant in Louisville to make the new, aluminum-sided Ford Expedition and Lincoln Navigator SUVs. Those vehicles will go on sale this fall and will be exported to more than 55 markets globally, the company said. The investment will secure 1,000 jobs at the Kentucky plant.

Plans for Focus production have bounced around over the last few months as Ford tries to squeeze some profits from the ailing small car segment. U.S. Focus sales were down 20 percent through May, hurt by low gas prices and consumer preference for SUVs.

In January, the company announced it would cancel a new plant in Mexico and instead use capacity at another plant in Mexico to build the Focus. But over the last few months, Hinrichs said, Ford decided it could save another $500 million in tooling and other manufacturing costs if it moved production to China.

Hinrichs said last month's departure of former CEO Mark Fields had no bearing on the decision, which was in the works for some time.

Hinrichs said Chinese wages are lower than wages in Mexico, although the cost to ship the vehicles erases some of that advantage. It's still cheaper to make cars for the U.S. in Mexico, he said, but Ford has extra capacity in China and the move frees up capital for the company immediately.

Ford isn't the first car company to export vehicles to the U.S. from China. Volvo Cars made the move in 2015. General Motors Co. started importing the low-volume Buick Envision midsize SUV from China in 2016. GM also imports small numbers of a plug-in hybrid-electric Cadillac CT6 sedans from China.




US Focus sales
2014 - 219,634
2015 - 202,478
2016 - 168,769

High volume car production from China for the US market. Great. Just **** ing great. **** ing tariff the **** out of that **** er.

 
Replies:

Ultimate Peach



Karma:
Posts: 3172
(3171 all sites)
Registered: 10/5/2005
Status: Offline

  posted on 6/20/2017 at 10:51 AM

Hard to believe its economically viable to build and ship a car over 7,000 miles back to your home country rather than build it here.

 

____________________

 

Zen Peach



Karma:
Posts: 19769
(20235 all sites)
Registered: 1/19/2002
Status: Offline

  posted on 6/20/2017 at 03:27 PM

Maybe they will do a good job and the old adage 'friends don't let friends drive Fords' will change. Remember when Kias were a joke in America, not anymore.

 

____________________
"Mankind is a single nation" "Allah did not make you a single people so he could try you in what he gave you, to him you will all return, he will inform you where you differed". Quran Chapter 2 Sura 213

 

Zen Peach



Karma:
Posts: 46765
(46766 all sites)
Registered: 7/8/2004
Status: Offline

  posted on 6/20/2017 at 05:53 PM
MAGA

 

____________________
"Live every week like it's Shark Week." - Tracy Jordan

 

Maximum Peach



Karma:
Posts: 9658
(9683 all sites)
Registered: 4/27/2003
Status: Offline

  posted on 6/21/2017 at 07:52 AM
quote:

Hard to believe its economically viable to build and ship a car over 7,000 miles back to your home country rather than build it here.


It just goes to show the huge financial advantages to building overseas and shipping back that they are willing to incur the shipping cost and it still makes sense for them. They say they have additional capacity at the China plant, well I assume if they were going to build it at an existing Mexican plant that it too has additional capacity to take on that line. Unless that whole Hermosillo thing was never going to happen and they were figuring out what else to do as an alternative.

quote:

Maybe they will do a good job and the old adage 'friends don't let friends drive Fords' will change. Remember when Kias were a joke in America, not anymore.


It isn't about them doing a good job or not. My opposition is typically not rooted in a quality concern when we talk about foreign made goods. It's the fact that we are losing the opportunity to build the facilities and employ the people necessary to make the things we buy. If a foreign company builds a product in their home country and exports it here, I get that. If a US company builds things here and exports them abroad for sale, that is normal. That is free trade. Free trade isn't supposed to be about a US company offshoring production to build a product simply to then export the product back to the US for sale.

I do remember when Kias were jokes. They've come a very long way. Thanks to the US consumer. I should figure out how many cars Kia sold in the US and how many were built here. I am pretty sure they still only build two models here out of maybe ten they sell.

quote:
MAGA


Right. Where is Trump? Has he tweated on this? Somebody in the trade or commerce department might've released a statement. I haven't looked it up.

Trump individually isn't able to do anything even if he wanted to. I'm mad. Too many Republicans in Congress will see nothing wrong here and not enough Democrats see the problem themselves.

The fact that the car was going to be built in Mexico and now it goes to China means that there is no direct US job effected if the Wayne plant indeed gets the new Ranger/Bronco. But imagine if they added the Ranger/Bronco line and kept building the Fusion here. Instead of keeping a static level of jobs in this scenario, they would add jobs. But no, we can't have that. The Corptocracy continues as does the selling out of the American working class.

Cars from China. Cars from **** ing China and we are letting it happen.

 

Zen Peach



Karma:
Posts: 9130
(25079 all sites)
Registered: 10/30/2010
Status: Offline

  posted on 6/21/2017 at 08:16 AM
KIAs are still pieces of **** .

 

____________________

 

Peach Extraordinaire



Karma:
Posts: 4397
(4408 all sites)
Registered: 12/18/2004
Status: Offline

  posted on 6/21/2017 at 07:35 PM
Trump said those jobs would NOT go to Mexico and by God he was right.
 

Zen Peach



Karma:
Posts: 19769
(20235 all sites)
Registered: 1/19/2002
Status: Offline

  posted on 6/22/2017 at 12:48 PM
quote:
quote:

Hard to believe its economically viable to build and ship a car over 7,000 miles back to your home country rather than build it here.


It just goes to show the huge financial advantages to building overseas and shipping back that they are willing to incur the shipping cost and it still makes sense for them. They say they have additional capacity at the China plant, well I assume if they were going to build it at an existing Mexican plant that it too has additional capacity to take on that line. Unless that whole Hermosillo thing was never going to happen and they were figuring out what else to do as an alternative.

quote:

Maybe they will do a good job and the old adage 'friends don't let friends drive Fords' will change. Remember when Kias were a joke in America, not anymore.


It isn't about them doing a good job or not. My opposition is typically not rooted in a quality concern when we talk about foreign made goods. It's the fact that we are losing the opportunity to build the facilities and employ the people necessary to make the things we buy. If a foreign company builds a product in their home country and exports it here, I get that. If a US company builds things here and exports them abroad for sale, that is normal. That is free trade. Free trade isn't supposed to be about a US company offshoring production to build a product simply to then export the product back to the US for sale.

I do remember when Kias were jokes. They've come a very long way. Thanks to the US consumer. I should figure out how many cars Kia sold in the US and how many were built here. I am pretty sure they still only build two models here out of maybe ten they sell.

quote:
MAGA


Right. Where is Trump? Has he tweated on this? Somebody in the trade or commerce department might've released a statement. I haven't looked it up.

Trump individually isn't able to do anything even if he wanted to. I'm mad. Too many Republicans in Congress will see nothing wrong here and not enough Democrats see the problem themselves.

The fact that the car was going to be built in Mexico and now it goes to China means that there is no direct US job effected if the Wayne plant indeed gets the new Ranger/Bronco. But imagine if they added the Ranger/Bronco line and kept building the Fusion here. Instead of keeping a static level of jobs in this scenario, they would add jobs. But no, we can't have that. The Corptocracy continues as does the selling out of the American working class.

Cars from China. Cars from **** ing China and we are letting it happen.


If Walmart opens up an Auto Service Center, then I think we'll know, we've all been sold out.

 

____________________
"Mankind is a single nation" "Allah did not make you a single people so he could try you in what he gave you, to him you will all return, he will inform you where you differed". Quran Chapter 2 Sura 213

 

Ultimate Peach



Karma:
Posts: 3216
(3219 all sites)
Registered: 1/7/2004
Status: Offline

  posted on 6/22/2017 at 02:47 PM
quote:
quote:
quote:

Hard to believe its economically viable to build and ship a car over 7,000 miles back to your home country rather than build it here.


It just goes to show the huge financial advantages to building overseas and shipping back that they are willing to incur the shipping cost and it still makes sense for them. They say they have additional capacity at the China plant, well I assume if they were going to build it at an existing Mexican plant that it too has additional capacity to take on that line. Unless that whole Hermosillo thing was never going to happen and they were figuring out what else to do as an alternative.

quote:

Maybe they will do a good job and the old adage 'friends don't let friends drive Fords' will change. Remember when Kias were a joke in America, not anymore.


It isn't about them doing a good job or not. My opposition is typically not rooted in a quality concern when we talk about foreign made goods. It's the fact that we are losing the opportunity to build the facilities and employ the people necessary to make the things we buy. If a foreign company builds a product in their home country and exports it here, I get that. If a US company builds things here and exports them abroad for sale, that is normal. That is free trade. Free trade isn't supposed to be about a US company offshoring production to build a product simply to then export the product back to the US for sale.

I do remember when Kias were jokes. They've come a very long way. Thanks to the US consumer. I should figure out how many cars Kia sold in the US and how many were built here. I am pretty sure they still only build two models here out of maybe ten they sell.

quote:
MAGA


Right. Where is Trump? Has he tweated on this? Somebody in the trade or commerce department might've released a statement. I haven't looked it up.

Trump individually isn't able to do anything even if he wanted to. I'm mad. Too many Republicans in Congress will see nothing wrong here and not enough Democrats see the problem themselves.

The fact that the car was going to be built in Mexico and now it goes to China means that there is no direct US job effected if the Wayne plant indeed gets the new Ranger/Bronco. But imagine if they added the Ranger/Bronco line and kept building the Fusion here. Instead of keeping a static level of jobs in this scenario, they would add jobs. But no, we can't have that. The Corptocracy continues as does the selling out of the American working class.

Cars from China. Cars from **** ing China and we are letting it happen.


If Walmart opens up an Auto Service Center, then I think we'll know, we've all been sold out.


If Walmart opens up an auto Service Center? IF? How oblivious are you?

 

Peach Extraordinaire



Karma:
Posts: 4397
(4408 all sites)
Registered: 12/18/2004
Status: Offline

  posted on 6/22/2017 at 10:33 PM
quote:
quote:
quote:
quote:

Hard to believe its economically viable to build and ship a car over 7,000 miles back to your home country rather than build it here.


It just goes to show the huge financial advantages to building overseas and shipping back that they are willing to incur the shipping cost and it still makes sense for them. They say they have additional capacity at the China plant, well I assume if they were going to build it at an existing Mexican plant that it too has additional capacity to take on that line. Unless that whole Hermosillo thing was never going to happen and they were figuring out what else to do as an alternative.

quote:

Maybe they will do a good job and the old adage 'friends don't let friends drive Fords' will change. Remember when Kias were a joke in America, not anymore.


It isn't about them doing a good job or not. My opposition is typically not rooted in a quality concern when we talk about foreign made goods. It's the fact that we are losing the opportunity to build the facilities and employ the people necessary to make the things we buy. If a foreign company builds a product in their home country and exports it here, I get that. If a US company builds things here and exports them abroad for sale, that is normal. That is free trade. Free trade isn't supposed to be about a US company offshoring production to build a product simply to then export the product back to the US for sale.

I do remember when Kias were jokes. They've come a very long way. Thanks to the US consumer. I should figure out how many cars Kia sold in the US and how many were built here. I am pretty sure they still only build two models here out of maybe ten they sell.

quote:
MAGA


Right. Where is Trump? Has he tweated on this? Somebody in the trade or commerce department might've released a statement. I haven't looked it up.

Trump individually isn't able to do anything even if he wanted to. I'm mad. Too many Republicans in Congress will see nothing wrong here and not enough Democrats see the problem themselves.

The fact that the car was going to be built in Mexico and now it goes to China means that there is no direct US job effected if the Wayne plant indeed gets the new Ranger/Bronco. But imagine if they added the Ranger/Bronco line and kept building the Fusion here. Instead of keeping a static level of jobs in this scenario, they would add jobs. But no, we can't have that. The Corptocracy continues as does the selling out of the American working class.

Cars from China. Cars from **** ing China and we are letting it happen.


If Walmart opens up an Auto Service Center, then I think we'll know, we've all been sold out.


If Walmart opens up an auto Service Center? IF? How oblivious are you?


I heard that Amazon is going to start selling books.

 

Peach Extraordinaire



Karma:
Posts: 4232
(4230 all sites)
Registered: 8/26/2006
Status: Offline

  posted on 6/22/2017 at 10:46 PM
quote:
Trump said those jobs would NOT go to Mexico and by God he was right.


He was bound to be right about something sooner or later.

 

Maximum Peach



Karma:
Posts: 9658
(9683 all sites)
Registered: 4/27/2003
Status: Offline

  posted on 6/23/2017 at 08:35 PM
Trump bashing aside, this is an important issue for our economy. Manufacturing jobs are critically important because of the number of people they employ at good wages and benefits plus all the related spin off and support jobs within the automotive industry is a key component of this segment. We need more of these jobs here, from both US and foreign auto companies.

But not all auto companies or auto manufacturing jobs are created equal. US companies do employ and invest more here, so their competitiveness with foreign companies needs to be considered so they are not at a disadvantage and can maintain and expand growth within the US rather than having to look abroad to stay competitive with other brands.

Allow me some selective copy and pasting from a 2016 report from the American Automotive Policy Council. You'll see reference to FCA, which is Fiat-Chrysler Automobiles US, still considered one of the 'big three'.

quote:
Every state is an “auto state.”

Last year, FCA US, Ford, and General Motors produced 6.4 million vehicles in the U.S., with the help of more than 232,000 employees, working at more than 220 assembly plants, manufacturing facilities,
research labs, distribution centers and other facilities, located in 32 states across 115 Congressional Districts. They work with more than 10,150 dealerships, which employ another 609,000 workers.

Nationwide, FCA US, Ford, and General Motors’s thousands of auto suppliers employ more than 734,000 U.S. workers.


quote:
Scale of the auto industry

Last year, Americans bought more than 17.4 million cars and trucks. Over 11.8 million of those cars and trucks were produced at one of America’s 47 automotive assembly plants. Lined up end-to-end, the cars and trucks assembled in the U.S. would stretch 35,600 miles, enough to stretch from the Statue of Liberty to the Golden Gate Bridge twelve times.

A typical auto plant requires between $1 and $2 billion in start-up capital investment and employs 2,000 to 3,000 workers. Each assembly plant job supports 9 to 12 others at suppliers and in the surrounding community. While plant output varies, a single plant producing 200,000 vehicles each year can contribute nearly $6 billion to America’s gross domestic product.

Each vehicle these plants assemble contains 8,000 to 12,000 different components (and as many as 15,000 individual parts). More than 5,600 suppliers produce auto parts in the U.S. Together, they employ more than 734,000 U.S. workers.


quote:
One way to measure an automaker’s investment in the U.S. is to compare its U.S. production to its U.S. sales. Last year, FCA US, Ford, and General Motors produced 6.4 million vehicles in the U.S.

That same year, FCA US, Ford, and General Motors sold 7.9 million vehicles here. In other words, their 2015 U.S. production represented 82% of their 2015 U.S. sales.

By comparison, foreign automakers’ U.S. production represented only 60% of their sales here.

As a result, Ford produced over 1 million more cars and trucks in the U.S. last year than Toyota or Honda, over three times as many vehicles as Hyundai-Kia, over six times more than BMW, and nearly 30 times more than VW. Similarly, FCA US assembled 511,000 more vehicles in the U.S. in 2015 than Toyota, even though Toyota sold 241,600 more vehicles here.

To produce more vehicles, automakers need more plants. General Motors operates as many plants as Toyota, Honda, Nissan, and Subaru, combined. Similarly, FCA US operates as many assembly plants as BMW, Daimler, Hyundai-Kia, Subaru, and VW, combined.

Because the auto industry is so big, the difference between FCA US, Ford, and General Motors’s 82% U.S. production rate and their competitors’ 60% U.S. production rate represents hundreds of thousands of jobs and billions in capital investment. In order to match FCA US, Ford, and General Motors’s U.S. production rate last year, foreign automakers would have needed to assemble more than 2.3 million more vehicles here last year.

To build 2.3 million more vehicles, foreign automakers would have to build eight plants, each employing approximately 3,000 U.S. workers and supporting tens of thousands of other workers.



quote:
FCA US, Ford, and General Motors capital investments in the U.S

Over the past six years alone, automakers have invested $48.1 billion in their U.S. assembly, engine and transmission plants, R&D labs, headquarters, administrative offices, and other infrastructure that connects and supports them.

FCA US, Ford, and General Motors made more than $30.8 billion of those $48.1 billion (about 64%) in investments. Their investment in U.S. facilities is five times greater than all Japanese and Korean automakers combined. Together, Toyota, Honda, Nissan, Isuzu, Subaru, Suzuki, Mazda, Mitsubishi, and Hyundai-Kia invested only $5.9 billion during this same six-year period. American automakers’ investment is five times greater than the combined investments of the three major European automakers competing in the U.S. (BMW, Daimler, and VW). Together, they invested only $5.9 billion over the past six years.


quote:

Automaker jobs

Automakers, their suppliers, their dealerships, and the local businesses that support them are responsible for more than 7.25 million U.S. jobs. No manufacturing sector employs more U.S. workers.

FCA US, Ford, and General Motors employment

Together, the 16 major automakers competing in the U.S. employ about about 353,000 U.S. workers. FCA US, Ford, and General Motors employ more than 232,000 of these U.S. workers. The fact that FCA US, Ford, and General Motors account for 67% of U.S. auto jobs is remarkable, because they account for only 45% of U.S. market share.

FCA US/Ford/General Motors employ 2 out of 3 of America’s autoworkers, translating to 232,000 jobs.

The reason for this disparity is simple. FCA US, Ford, and General Motors produce more of their vehicles here, conduct more of their research here, and buy more of their parts here. As a result, they have based six times more of their global workforce in the U.S. than their competitors.



quote:
A steep curve on “domestic content”

Automakers sell more than 350 different models in the U.S. Those models contain anywhere from 80% to 0% “domestic content” (American- or Canadian-made parts, as defined by the American Automotive Labeling Act (AALA)).

While American auto suppliers produce hundreds of billions of dollars worth of parts each year, they are used in a comparatively small portion of American vehicles. Only one in five models contains 60% or more domestic content. More than half of them contain less than 10% domestic content.

From a domestic content perspective, cars and trucks offer a steep curve. FCA US, Ford, and General Motors dominate the top. Two out of three of their models contain 55% or more domestic content. By comparison, two out of three of their competitors’ models contain 5% or less domestic content. Some foreign manufacturers score better than others. For example, Honda’s domestic content matches its domestic competitors, while even the U.S. assembled models from BMW contain 25% or less domestic content.

To appreciate the scale of this difference, consider what would happen if foreign automakers matched FCA US, Ford, and General Motors’s record. FCA US, Ford, and General Motors’s fleets contain 58% domestic content (on a sales-weighted basis). Foreign automaker fleets contain only 32% domestic content. Had foreign automakers increased their use of domestic content to match FCA US, Ford, and General Motors’s content rate (from 32 to 58%), they would have insourced the equivalent of more than 2.4 million cars’-worth-of-parts last year.



http://www.americanautocouncil.org/sites/aapc2016/files/2016_Economic_Contr ibution_Report.pdf


[Edited on 6/24/2017 by nebish]

 

Maximum Peach



Karma:
Posts: 9658
(9683 all sites)
Registered: 4/27/2003
Status: Offline

  posted on 6/23/2017 at 08:56 PM
Kia’s 2016 US sales were 647,598. The US assembled Sorento accounted for 114,733 and the US assembled Optima 124,203 units combining for 238,936 units leaving 408,662, or 63%, foreign built imported Kia’s sold in the US among 10 other models sold here, including their #1 seller the Soul. In 2000 their market share was just under 1% with US sales of 160,606, today it is over 3.5% and has flirted with 4% in 2011-12.

Market share of other growing foreign auto companies has also risen. Hyundai has gone from 1.4% in 2000 when they sold 244,391 units compared to 2016 with a 4.38% market share and 768,057 units. Nissan has gone from 3.9% and 673,737 units in 2000 to 8.13% and 1,426,130. Subaru grown from 1% on 172,218 units to 3.51% and 615,132.

Meanwhile Chevrolet’s market share has decreased from 15.10% in 2000 selling 2,615,884 units to 2016 with a 11.95% market share and 2,096,508 units in sales. Buick down from 2% and 339,445 units to 1.31% and 229,631 units. Cadillac down modestly from 1.1% 189,154 units to .97% and 170,006 units. GMC has modest growth from 3.05% and 528,639 units to 3.12% and 546,628 units last year.

Ford has also taken a hit from 19.9% market share in 2000 selling 3,457,996 units to 14.18% share in 2016 on 2,487,487 units. Lincoln has dropped from 1.1% on 193,009 units to .64% on 111,724 units.

Fiat-Chrylser Autos U S- the Chysler, Dodge and Jeep brands still have a very large US assembly production and investment footprint.

Chrysler is down from a market share of 2.79% in 2000 to 1.37% 2016. Dodge has dropped from 7.34% to 2.89%, although that very large drop can be mostly attributed to Dodge trucks being rebranded as Ram in 2009.

Jeep is the only quasi-US brand that has seen growth since 2000, from 2.86% market share and 495,434 units to 5.3% and 929,446 units.

The biggest US companies that employ the most, invest the most and build the most here are losing market share to foreign competitors, foreign companies who employ less, invest less and build less here. That puts pressure US auto companies to lower costs so a smaller sales volume can be more profitable and so they can better position MSRP for the imports. The way they lower costs are invest less here and invest more abroad to build cheaper autos to import into the US. This hurts both hourly and salary American workers. It hurts future job opportunities. It hurts own communities, schools, parks, libraries and emergency first responders who rely on tax dollars. It hurts property values. It hurts our tax base and it stresses state and federal social safety net programs.

Opening up this market to Chinese built cars is only going to exacerbate this problem. Soon it will not just be Ford making the Focus in China, but no doubt other US and foreign companies will follow suit and it is only a matter of time before a Chinese auto company will be selling cars here, taking market share of their own and hurting US workers.

We are swirling around the drain. If our trade and economic policies are not changed our nation will be sucked down never to recover.

 

Zen Peach



Karma:
Posts: 46765
(46766 all sites)
Registered: 7/8/2004
Status: Offline

  posted on 6/23/2017 at 09:06 PM
quote:
Trump bashing aside


So, about that Carrier thing...

 

____________________
"Live every week like it's Shark Week." - Tracy Jordan

 

Maximum Peach



Karma:
Posts: 9658
(9683 all sites)
Registered: 4/27/2003
Status: Offline

  posted on 6/23/2017 at 09:36 PM
quote:
quote:
Trump bashing aside


So, about that Carrier thing...




It's the exact same thing! Same god damn thing. We need jobs like these in our country. And our elected representatives and leaders fail us time and time and time and time again, ad nauseam.

Mud throwing is too easy. Maybe it's fun, but all it does is pit us against each other and gloss over any number of issues. I know you think bigger than that.

I saw a guy on TV tonight, said he planned to retire from that Carrier plant. Well sucks for you buddy, we got this thing free trade, maybe you can buy a cheaper AC now. Don't worry, you'll be making less at your new job, but the imported product will cost less (in theory). Race to the bottom, oh the fun!

How about this quote from a Carrier worker back in January:

quote:
Carol Bigbee, 59, who has worked at Carrier for over 13 years, earns $22 an hour. Her daughter has a bachelor’s degree and works in a medical lab, but earns one-third less.

“You have to be really blessed to find a job that pays that kind of money,” she said.


Hey Carol, silly you. We have free trade you know, so go and get retrained and get a new job so you can make one-third less like your daughter with her all-important degree. How is that for prosperity? The American Dream!

quote:
“These are truly irreplaceable jobs,” said Scott Paul, president of the Alliance for American Manufacturing, an advocacy group, and a native of Rensselaer, Ind. “A manufacturing job is one of the only ladders to fulfilling the American dream for a worker without a college degree.”

“A manufacturing worker who loses their job at Carrier will be resigned to facing a lower standard of living and leaner retirement years,” Mr. Paul added



No worries. Trump is an ass. Democrats can't win elections. Russia Russia Russia. Emails Emails Emails. Down the river we go without a paddle.

 

Sublime Peach



Karma:
Posts: 7845
(7845 all sites)
Registered: 7/18/2010
Status: Offline

  posted on 6/24/2017 at 03:30 PM
More like up a certain creek without a paddle
 
 


Powered by XForum 1.81.1 by Trollix Software

Privacy | Terms of Service | Report Infringement | Personal Data Management | Contact Us
The ALLMAN BROTHERS BAND name, The ALLMAN BROTHERS name, likenesses, logos, mushroom design and peach truck are all registered trademarks of THE ABB MERCHANDISING CO., INC. whose rights are specifically reserved. Any artwork, visual, or audio representations used on this web site CONTAINING ANY REGISTERED TRADEMARKS are under license from The ABB MERCHANDISING CO., INC. A REVOCABLE, GRATIS LICENSE IS GRANTED TO ALL REGISTERED PEACH CORP MEMBERS FOR The DOWNLOADING OF ONE COPY FOR PERSONAL USE ONLY. ANY DISTRIBUTION OR REPRODUCTION OF THE TRADEMARKS CONTAINED HEREIN ARE PROHIBITED AND ARE SPECIFICALLY RESERVED BY THE ABB MERCHANDISING CO.,INC.
site by Hittin' the Web Group with www.experiencewasabi3d.com