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Author: Subject: Trump in Saudi Arabia

Maximum Peach





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  posted on 5/21/2017 at 06:06 PM
Anyone see or hear the speech? I heard it on the radio, tuned in towards the end of the Saudi king's speech. Sounded like Saudis were ready to bring their war with Iran from under the table.

Trump's speech I thought was easily the best I've heard from him. I mean, yeah, the bar is low, but still it stands up well with other major speeches to foreign bodies and this being the first major speech on the world stage from somebody not known for giving good speeches. Critics of the President should be relieved I think. Somebody yesterday on CNN or MSNBC said they expected a diplomatic crisis out of this trip. Ever the pessimists. Supporters of the President can be happy Trump was able to pull it off.

The message was there, softened around the edges, but still sharp to the point at it's core. Some hardliners on the right may've wanted something more antagonistic. I thought it had some moments of a lecture feel, although I agreed with the subject matter and points being made. The speech probably fell on deaf ears by some in attendance, but some probably knew what the President was saying was true and will welcome a deeper relationship with the US.

I thought it was well written and well delivered. Not sure who the principle writer(s) were. I will try and catch a replay or watch online.

At the end of the day it is a speech and it is just words. Action is what needs to follow. If we get more cooperation from a majority of the countries in attendance and if it we can yield some more positive results against islamic extremism everyone in the world stand to benefit.

 
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True Peach



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  posted on 5/21/2017 at 06:59 PM
So trump made a deal to sell weapons to the largest sponsor of terrorism against the USA
 

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  posted on 5/21/2017 at 07:21 PM
quote:

I thought it was well written and well delivered. Not sure who the principle writer(s) were. I will try and catch a replay or watch online.


He gave a prepared speech by speechwriters and stayed on point. This is what a President is expected to; even Trump. It was a similar speech as given before by Bush & somewhat Obama. He stayed away from his amped up campaign rhetoric when he used the term "radical Islamic terrorism" to incite his angry base of voters over & over at speeches. Even Trump is "probably" smart enough to know that wouldn't have gone over well. On the other hand, his audience today knows of his stance on Muslims & immigration.

It was a well delivered speech & will earn him a few miles, but looming in the background are his many problems with Russia.

 

Maximum Peach



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  posted on 5/22/2017 at 07:53 AM
quote:
So trump made a deal to sell weapons to the largest sponsor of terrorism against the USA


Pops likes to throw some zingers, but this is a statement that alot of people raise. Why would the US cozy up and arm a country such as Saudi Arabia?

First off, Saudi Arabia is not an official state sponsor of terrorism, those nations are Iran, Sudan and Syria (all 3 make up half the Trump travel ban). But, in terms of non-state sourced terror funding from within Saudi Arabia they most likely top the list. And one could say that the Saudi government has a history of playing both sides of the fence. This has been changing in terms of what the government is willing to say and do to combat terrorism. The Saudis themselves face threats of terrorism and have in fact suffered attacks at the hands of terrorists. ISIS has named the Saudi government their enemy.

The relationship and actual constructive anti-terrorism work out of Saudi Arabia has come a long way. Remember their critical intelligence shared with the US and UK uncovered a 2010 Al Qaeda plan of concealed bombs inside packages sent out of Yemen. In addition to that kind of vital intelligence resources, the Saudis themselves have arrested and killed Al Qaeda operatives in their own country.

What we are seeing is more cooparation and coordination out of the Saudis to assist both the US efforts and the internal Saudi efforts to combat threats.

As for selling them arms and the implication "well Republican Presidents signing arms sales to foreign countries to satisfy the military industrial complex, etc, etc, etc"...fact is the US government has been selling arms to Saudi Arabia for many many years, Democrats and Republicans both. It happened on Obama's watch and it is was going to continue to happen even if the current President's name would've been Clinton.

Effectiveness or justification aside, from their point of view the Saudis need to purchase weapsons now more than ever as they are engaged in the 2 year military fight against Yemen.


 

Maximum Peach



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  posted on 5/22/2017 at 08:14 AM
There was another deal as well:

quote:
RIYADH: Saudi Arabia and the US on Saturday agreed a “Joint Strategic Vision Declaration” covering aspects like diplomacy, trade, security and the fight against terror.
It was co-signed by King Salman and US President Donald Trump at the Al-Yamamah Palace in Riyadh.

The White House said in a statement that the declaration reflects the two countries’ efforts to boost “their strategic partnership for the 21st century” and to chart “a renewed path toward a peaceful Middle East where economic development, trade and diplomacy are hallmarks of regional and global engagement.”

The two nations plan to form a Strategic Joint Consultative Group, hosted by the US president and Saudi king, or their appropriate representatives, to chart the course of this strategic partnership. It will meet at least once a year, alternating between the two countries.

“Our two great countries share a desire to address the threats to our shared security interests. Thus, the United States of America and the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia seek to embark on new initiatives to counter violent extremist messaging, disrupt financing of terrorism, and advance defense cooperation,” the White House statement said.

“Violent extremists who threaten peace in the Middle East will find a growing group of regional partners arrayed against them, confronting their aggression and sowing the seeds of peace.
“A robust, integrated regional security architecture is critical to our cooperation. The United States of America and the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia intend to expand engagement with other countries in the region over the coming years and to identify new areas of cooperation. Over the course of our history, the United States of America and the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia have developed a productive partnership built upon trust, cooperation, and shared interests. We now stand together to thwart our common enemies, to strengthen the bonds between us, and to chart a path towards peace and prosperity for all.”

http://www.arabnews.com/node/1102616/saudi-arabia




 

Maximum Peach



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  posted on 5/22/2017 at 08:35 AM
quote:
quote:

I thought it was well written and well delivered. Not sure who the principle writer(s) were. I will try and catch a replay or watch online.


He gave a prepared speech by speechwriters and stayed on point. This is what a President is expected to; even Trump. It was a similar speech as given before by Bush & somewhat Obama. He stayed away from his amped up campaign rhetoric when he used the term "radical Islamic terrorism" to incite his angry base of voters over & over at speeches. Even Trump is "probably" smart enough to know that wouldn't have gone over well. On the other hand, his audience today knows of his stance on Muslims & immigration.

It was a well delivered speech & will earn him a few miles, but looming in the background are his many problems with Russia.


The scope of focusing so heavily on terrorism is likely a little too narrow for an Obama speech. Obama liked to try and draw people together in more broader senses and speak to a bigger picture. Trump touched on some other commonalities and goals, but what, probably 75% of the speech focused on the threat and destruction terrorism.

Trump refrained from the "radical islamic terror" line. The closest he came was coupling the words "islamic extremism" and "islamic terror". President Obama spoke of extremism or terror, but left it vague enough as to apply it to all types of extremism or terrorism without explicitly assigning the source. In that regard Trump did take the point up a notch while walking the line to not alienate the group he was addressing.

You know at the time this was going on yesterday there was the story about Notre Dame graduates walking out on VP Pence at their commencement. I found it ironic, here is President Trump addressing foreign leaders of Muslim nations, and they sat there, out of respect for their country and perhaps respect for the USA and listened to a man they have seen painted as a liar and hostile towards their faith. Contrast that with South Bend Indiana you have kids thinking they don't have to listen to somebody with whom they disagree or question and disrespect the US Vice President, their Vice President and walk out. I was that immature once as well, glad I grew up.

 

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  posted on 5/22/2017 at 08:48 AM
I found this commentary interesting

http://www.cnn.com/2017/05/21/opinions/trump-riyadh-trip-opinion-bergen/ind ex.html

Bergen: The real reason Saudis rolled out the reddest of red carpets
By Peter Bergen, CNN National Security Analyst
Updated 8:26 AM ET, Mon May 22, 2017

Riyadh (CNN)Imagine Houston run by an efficient version of the Taliban, and you get an approximation of what it is like to live in Riyadh, the Saudi capital.

But to understand the significance of President Donald Trump's visit to Riyadh and his much-anticipated speech on Islam, you must also understand a bit more about the center of Saudi power.

Riyadh is a sprawling city of more than 6 million built by massive oil revenues, punctuated by soaring skyscrapers, stitched together by smooth freeways and surrounded by endless sand-colored suburbs that march ever outward to the empty deserts.

But Riyadh, despite its seemingly shiny veneer, is in trouble. For the first time in decades the Saudi monarchy can no longer rely on the revenues from oil to maintain its position as the leading Arab state and to buy off any aspirations that the Saudi population might have to play a real role in politics.

That's because the days of $100-a-barrel oil are long gone and are unlikely to return anytime soon. And it is this reality that made President Trump's trip to Riyadh and his speech on Sunday so important to the Saudi monarchy.

It's not just that they share a common interest in checking what they both regard as excessive Iranian influence in the Middle East. Both sides also see great value in the almost $110 billion arms deal signed during Trump's visit, which aims, in part, to bulk up domestic Saudi arms production and create new jobs in Saudi Arabia. And that's in addition to $55 billion in deals with US companies that were also announced during Trump's visit.

The rationale for these deals is simple -- to jump-start the Saudi economy and bring new jobs to the private sector, as Saudi Foreign Minister Adel al-Jubeir explained at a press conference on Saturday. "We expect that these investments over the next 10 years or so will provide hundreds of thousands of jobs in both the United States and in Saudi Arabia," he said. "They will lead to a transfer of technology from the US to Saudi Arabia, enhance our economy and also enhance the American investments in Saudi Arabia, which already are the largest investments of anyone."

When oil wealth seemed an endless spigot of gold, the absolute Saudi monarchy created, somewhat paradoxically, a quasi-socialist state: an astonishing 90% of Saudis work for the government and have long enjoyed subsidies for water, electricity and gas. Health care and education are free.

But, in late 2015, the IMF warned that, given falling oil prices, the Saudi government could run out of financial reserves in five years if it kept up its present rate of spending.

With oil prices holding steady at around $50 a barrel, the Saudi government is now cutting government salaries and reducing subsidies. Trump's visit -- and deals -- therefore create a critical opportunity in the private sector for Saudis who can no longer exclusively depend on the government.

King Salman -- who became King in 2015 and for almost five decades was the governor of Riyadh, overseeing its explosive growth from a city of a few hundred thousand in the mid-1960s to the massive city it is today -- has empowered his 31-year-old son, the Deputy Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman, to also play a role in addressing Saudi's immediate demands. He is charged with modernizing Saudi society slowly and diversifying the Saudi economy quickly.

The Saudi government calls it "Vision 2030." The aim is to privatize the education, health care, agriculture, mining and defense sectors and to sell off Saudi Aramco, perhaps the wealthiest company in the world, which is estimated to be worth around a trillion dollars. The Saudis expect the United States to be a key player in all this, particularly given Trump's expertise in corporate America.

And the time is ripe for the Saudi monarchy to begin to transform its economic base. Its country is both young and incredibly connected -- 70% of the population is under 30, and 93% of Saudis use the Internet, far more than in the United States.

The declining role of the religious police

Riyadh sits in the Nejd heartland of Saudi Arabia, where in the mid-18th century the first Saudi King allied with Muhammad bin Abdul-Wahhab, a cleric who promoted a harsh interpretation of Sunni Islam.

This alliance is a marriage of convenience that has survived for more than two and half centuries and is the key to the political economy of Saudi Arabia in which the Saudis have retained absolute authority -- so much so that their family name is embedded in the name of the country -- while the Wahhabi religious establishment sanctions the rule of the absolute monarchy and has largely held sway over the social mores of Saudi society.

Until a year ago, compliance with the dictates of Saudi-style Wahhabi Islam were rigorously enforced by members of the feared religious police, known as the Committee for the Promotion of Virtue and the Prevention of Vice (the same name that was used by the Taliban's religious police when the Taliban were in power in Afghanistan).

The religious police patrolled the streets looking for purported malefactors and were given a more or less free hand to do so. In one notorious episode in 2002, in the holy city of Mecca, the religious police prevented girls from fleeing a school that was on fire because they were not properly dressed. Fifteen of them perished in the flames.

But, last April, the wings of the religious police were clipped by King Salman and his son MBS, as he is universally known here. They no longer have the power to arrest suspects and now can only report them to regular police units.

In addition to getting the religious police to back off, the Saudi monarchy has allowed some music concerts to happen, but their biggest ambition, as described above, is to wean Saudi Arabia from its almost total dependence on oil revenues.

The Saudis see the Trump administration as a key to this, and that's why they rolled out the reddest of red carpets for the President's visit.

In return, Trump received the perfect platform to give his speech on Islam. After all, where better to make that speech than in the holy land of Saudi Arabia, home to the sacred cities of Mecca and Medina? And who better to convene the leaders of every Muslim country to hear Trump speak than the Saudi royal family?

The speech

In Riyadh, the city where Osama bin Laden was born six decades ago, President Trump delivered his much-anticipated speech Sunday to leaders from around the Islamic world.

The stakes needless to say were high. Candidate Trump had previously opined that "Islam hates us" and had called for "the total and complete shutdown of Muslims entering the United States," an argument he has since modified and moderated.

Nonetheless, such rhetoric on the campaign trail made Trump an unpopular figure across the Muslim world. A poll released in early November ahead of the US presidential election found that only 9% of those polled in the Middle East and North Africa would have voted for Trump versus 44% for Hillary Clinton.

After he was elected, Trump had also attempted to ban temporarily travel from a half dozen Muslim countries to the United States, an order that was midwifed by a top policy adviser, Stephen Miller, who now had the unenviable task of also being the "lead pen" for the President's keynote speech on Islam.

Trump's speech was billed as a "reset" with the Muslim world, just as President Obama's was eight years ago when he went to Cairo and declared "I have come here to seek a new beginning between the United States and Muslims around the world; one based upon mutual interest and respect..."

During the presidential campaign in August, Trump panned Obama's Cairo speech, castigating Obama for a "misguided" speech that didn't condemn "the oppression of women and gays in many Muslim nations, and the systematic violations of human rights, or the financing of global terrorism..."

Of course, it's all a lot more complicated when you are President, and Trump raised none of these issues in his Riyadh speech, instead emphasizing the scourge of terrorism, which is something that pretty much anyone in the Islamic world and the West can agree upon.

Trump did use the term "Islamic terrorism," which critics assert conflates Islam with terrorism, but his speech, which was received with polite attention from the leaders of the Muslim world, was a largely anodyne account of the need for civilized countries to work together to defeat terrorist groups in the name of our common humanity and -- minus some swipes at Iran -- could have been delivered by President Obama.

Speeches, of course, are not policies, and Obama's initial popularity in much of the Muslim world waned after he ordered a large surge of troops into Afghanistan, greatly ramped up drone strikes in Pakistan and Yemen and failed to intervene in any meaningful way to end the Syrian civil war.

The same surely will hold true for Trump. If his administration continues to pursue its travel ban from six Muslim-majority countries in the courts and does little to bring peace to the Middle East, whether in Syria or between the Israelis and the Palestinians, any bump he might get from his Riyadh speech will prove as ephemeral as the sandstorms that occasionally blast through the Saudi capital.

But even if Trump's speech does not herald any real changes in US national security policies, the business deals that the Trump administration is helping to broker with the Saudis will help move the Saudi economy away from its total dependence on oil.

 

____________________
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Who are all those people that he's locked away up there
Are they crazy?,
Are they sainted?
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It has never been explained since at first it was created

 

True Peach



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  posted on 5/22/2017 at 09:15 AM
quote:
quote:
So trump made a deal to sell weapons to the largest sponsor of terrorism against the USA


Pops likes to throw some zingers, but this is a statement that alot of people raise. Why would the US cozy up and arm a country such as Saudi Arabia?

First off, Saudi Arabia is not an official state sponsor of terrorism, those nations are Iran, Sudan and Syria (all 3 make up half the Trump travel ban). But, in terms of non-state sourced terror funding from within Saudi Arabia they most likely top the list. And one could say that the Saudi government has a history of playing both sides of the fence. This has been changing in terms of what the government is willing to say and do to combat terrorism. The Saudis themselves face threats of terrorism and have in fact suffered attacks at the hands of terrorists. ISIS has named the Saudi government their enemy.

The relationship and actual constructive anti-terrorism work out of Saudi Arabia has come a long way. Remember their critical intelligence shared with the US and UK uncovered a 2010 Al Qaeda plan of concealed bombs inside packages sent out of Yemen. In addition to that kind of vital intelligence resources, the Saudis themselves have arrested and killed Al Qaeda operatives in their own country.

What we are seeing is more cooparation and coordination out of the Saudis to assist both the US efforts and the internal Saudi efforts to combat threats.

As for selling them arms and the implication "well Republican Presidents signing arms sales to foreign countries to satisfy the military industrial complex, etc, etc, etc"...fact is the US government has been selling arms to Saudi Arabia for many many years, Democrats and Republicans both. It happened on Obama's watch and it is was going to continue to happen even if the current President's name would've been Clinton.

Effectiveness or justification aside, from their point of view the Saudis need to purchase weapsons now more than ever as they are engaged in the 2 year military fight against Yemen.


Saudi arabia is the largest state sponsor of terrorism in the world today. to say it is iran, is just not factual.

[Edited on 5/22/2017 by pops42]

 

Universal Peach



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  posted on 5/22/2017 at 09:43 AM
quote:
quote:
quote:

I thought it was well written and well delivered. Not sure who the principle writer(s) were. I will try and catch a replay or watch online.


He gave a prepared speech by speechwriters and stayed on point. This is what a President is expected to; even Trump. It was a similar speech as given before by Bush & somewhat Obama. He stayed away from his amped up campaign rhetoric when he used the term "radical Islamic terrorism" to incite his angry base of voters over & over at speeches. Even Trump is "probably" smart enough to know that wouldn't have gone over well. On the other hand, his audience today knows of his stance on Muslims & immigration.

It was a well delivered speech & will earn him a few miles, but looming in the background are his many problems with Russia.


The scope of focusing so heavily on terrorism is likely a little too narrow for an Obama speech. Obama liked to try and draw people together in more broader senses and speak to a bigger picture. Trump touched on some other commonalities and goals, but what, probably 75% of the speech focused on the threat and destruction terrorism.

Trump refrained from the "radical islamic terror" line. The closest he came was coupling the words "islamic extremism" and "islamic terror". President Obama spoke of extremism or terror, but left it vague enough as to apply it to all types of extremism or terrorism without explicitly assigning the source. In that regard Trump did take the point up a notch while walking the line to not alienate the group he was addressing.

You know at the time this was going on yesterday there was the story about Notre Dame graduates walking out on VP Pence at their commencement. I found it ironic, here is President Trump addressing foreign leaders of Muslim nations, and they sat there, out of respect for their country and perhaps respect for the USA and listened to a man they have seen painted as a liar and hostile towards their faith. Contrast that with South Bend Indiana you have kids thinking they don't have to listen to somebody with whom they disagree or question and disrespect the US Vice President, their Vice President and walk out. I was that immature once as well, glad I grew up.


President Trump stayed far above the rhetoric of the left and the losers.
He spoke to those in attendance directly and honestly. Quite refreshing after the eight years of Obama the Islamic Extremist Terrorist Sympathizer.

The corrupt liberal media has falsely portrayed President Trump as anti-Muslim.
President Trump is anti-terrorism and isn't scared to say so which is why he has garnered so much praise in The Middle East.

The Saudi King met President Trump at the airport, a gesture of respect Obama never received.
President Trump stood tall and shook The Kings hand like a man and our President unlike Obama who bowed and embarrassed our country.

Oh well. Let the left say what they wish.
I'm not a liberal and support free speech.

 

Maximum Peach



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  posted on 5/22/2017 at 09:58 AM
quote:
I found this commentary interesting

http://www.cnn.com/2017/05/21/opinions/trump-riyadh-trip-opinion-bergen/ind ex.html


Yes, agreed interesting.

I might take exception with the claim that $100 barrel oil was so critical to the Saudis because crude oil was only priced at that level for a few years in the early 80s and then recently for approximately 5 years from the 2007, 2010-2014 period. Price per barrel of oil now is maybe $20 higher compared to the approximately 20 year average it was at from the mid 80s to the mid 00s. But yes, no doubt, as they have provided services to a growing population the costs of maintaining those services can become a burden, if they projected revenue based on the 2007, 2010-2014 period they could be in trouble. If they projected revenue based off of a longer historic average then maybe not so much. There output is still very high. In 2015 and 2016 there average crude production a day was 10,168,247 and 10,460,710 barrels. Those are the only years on record of them exceeding 10 million barrels per day. So the volume is still there. Back when oil was $100 say in 2007 they only produced 8,721,507 brl per day. http://www.eia.gov/totalenergy/data/browser/xls.php?tbl=T11...

Net take away, everyone needs to diversify themselves and that story sheds a light on how the Saudis look to do that.

 

Maximum Peach



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  posted on 5/22/2017 at 10:00 AM
quote:
Saudi arabia is the largest state sponsor of terrorism in the world today. to say it is iran, is just not factual.


I'm sorry, my source is the US Department of State. You have a better source?

https://www.state.gov/j/ct/list/c14151.htm

Only three nations have official state sponsor of terror designation, what list are you working off of?

 

Universal Peach



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  posted on 5/22/2017 at 10:22 AM
quote:
quote:
Saudi arabia is the largest state sponsor of terrorism in the world today. to say it is iran, is just not factual.


I'm sorry, my source is the US Department of State. You have a better source?

https://www.state.gov/j/ct/list/c14151.htm

Only three nations have official state sponsor of terror designation, what list are you working off of?


Pops is factually challenged.
His post was straight out of the corrupt liberal media's playbook and sadly he actually believes it.
When someone hides from the facts they are doomed to get crushed by the facts.

 

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  posted on 5/22/2017 at 11:31 AM
quote:
Contrast that with South Bend Indiana you have kids thinking they don't have to listen to somebody with whom they disagree or question and disrespect the US Vice President, their Vice President and walk out. I was that immature once as well, glad I grew up.


Given Pence's record as Governor of Indiana, there's a good chance people would have walked out if he was speaking as the Governor, especially with LGBT students.

They got up and walked out silently. The horror, processed through the confirmation bias filter. Will the Republic survive?

Maybe they should have stayed and yelled out "You lie!" That's a form of protest any rightist can get behind during any speech.

 

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  posted on 5/22/2017 at 12:03 PM
quote:
What we are seeing is more cooparation and coordination out of the Saudis to assist both the US efforts and the internal Saudi efforts to combat threats.


Their society is medieval and backwards, and their treatment of women in their society is abhorrent. That's not going away no matter which President from what party is in office.

 

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  posted on 5/22/2017 at 12:51 PM
quote:
The Saudi King met President Trump at the airport, a gesture of respect Obama never received.


15 out of the 19 9/11 high jackets were Saudis, as is the Bin Laden family, and here you are praising and worshipping them, while condemning Americans in the same sentence. Are you sure you are on America's side? It sounds like you want to be a Saudi.

 

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  posted on 5/22/2017 at 12:55 PM
Muleman, when you show everyone that a group of voters can affect you like this and make you unravel on a daily basis, it makes you look dysfunctional and weak, just letting you know. A strong person wouldn't let it bother them. Trying to help you buddy.
 

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  posted on 5/22/2017 at 03:13 PM
quote:
quote:
Contrast that with South Bend Indiana you have kids thinking they don't have to listen to somebody with whom they disagree or question and disrespect the US Vice President, their Vice President and walk out. I was that immature once as well, glad I grew up.


Given Pence's record as Governor of Indiana, there's a good chance people would have walked out if he was speaking as the Governor, especially with LGBT students.

They got up and walked out silently. The horror, processed through the confirmation bias filter. Will the Republic survive?

Maybe they should have stayed and yelled out "You lie!" That's a form of protest any rightist can get behind during any speech.


I don't condone Wilson's behavior towards President Obama.



quote:
quote:
quote:What we are seeing is more cooparation and coordination out of the Saudis to assist both the US efforts and the internal Saudi efforts to combat threats.




quote:
Their society is medieval and backwards, and their treatment of women in their society is abhorrent. That's not going away no matter which President from what party is in office.



That is true. But I didn't suggest that our President, current or future, would or could change that. What I did state was that cooperation and coordination between the US and the Saudis on counterterrorism has grown closer.

I can never remember if the US is more resented globally for trying to change foreign societies and belief systems or if we are more hated for looking the other way and allowing life in some country continue in some twisted and backwards norms of the region. I'll let the people in those societies and cultures decide that how they want to live for themselves as long as they aren't trying to kill Americans.


 

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  posted on 5/22/2017 at 06:01 PM
quote:
quote:
quote:
quote:

I thought it was well written and well delivered. Not sure who the principle writer(s) were. I will try and catch a replay or watch online.


He gave a prepared speech by speechwriters and stayed on point. This is what a President is expected to; even Trump. It was a similar speech as given before by Bush & somewhat Obama. He stayed away from his amped up campaign rhetoric when he used the term "radical Islamic terrorism" to incite his angry base of voters over & over at speeches. Even Trump is "probably" smart enough to know that wouldn't have gone over well. On the other hand, his audience today knows of his stance on Muslims & immigration.

It was a well delivered speech & will earn him a few miles, but looming in the background are his many problems with Russia.


The scope of focusing so heavily on terrorism is likely a little too narrow for an Obama speech. Obama liked to try and draw people together in more broader senses and speak to a bigger picture. Trump touched on some other commonalities and goals, but what, probably 75% of the speech focused on the threat and destruction terrorism.

Trump refrained from the "radical islamic terror" line. The closest he came was coupling the words "islamic extremism" and "islamic terror". President Obama spoke of extremism or terror, but left it vague enough as to apply it to all types of extremism or terrorism without explicitly assigning the source. In that regard Trump did take the point up a notch while walking the line to not alienate the group he was addressing.

You know at the time this was going on yesterday there was the story about Notre Dame graduates walking out on VP Pence at their commencement. I found it ironic, here is President Trump addressing foreign leaders of Muslim nations, and they sat there, out of respect for their country and perhaps respect for the USA and listened to a man they have seen painted as a liar and hostile towards their faith. Contrast that with South Bend Indiana you have kids thinking they don't have to listen to somebody with whom they disagree or question and disrespect the US Vice President, their Vice President and walk out. I was that immature once as well, glad I grew up.


President Trump stayed far above the rhetoric of the left and the losers.
He spoke to those in attendance directly and honestly. Quite refreshing after the eight years of Obama the Islamic Extremist Terrorist Sympathizer.

The corrupt liberal media has falsely portrayed President Trump as anti-Muslim.
President Trump is anti-terrorism and isn't scared to say so which is why he has garnered so much praise in The Middle East.

The Saudi King met President Trump at the airport, a gesture of respect Obama never received.
President Trump stood tall and shook The Kings hand like a man and our President unlike Obama who bowed and embarrassed our country.

Oh well. Let the left say what they wish.
I'm not a liberal and support free speech.



As someone who seems to be on the left I wish we would ditch our alliance with Saudi Arabia. They are as bad as the Iranians If they ditch the Sharia law and move towards a more open society for everybody then we should work with them.

Here's a good commentary piece about our supporting these regimes in the Middle East.

http://www.reuters.com/article/us-trump-middle-east-commentary-idUSKBN18I22 P

State Departments report on Human Rights In Saudi Arabia
https://www.state.gov/j/drl/rls/hrrpt/humanrightsreport/#wrapper

But I bet that Trump likes that it is a family that is in control of Saudi Arabia.

 

Maximum Peach



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  posted on 5/23/2017 at 07:07 AM
From the Reuters piece:

quote:
More broadly, Trump’s speech – like his administration’s muddled strategy to fight Islamic State and other jihadist groups – failed to address one of the root causes of extremism: the very monarchs, autocrats and strongmen who assembled to hear Trump. For decades, America pursued the path that Trump seems to favor in the Middle East – stability and security cooperation, at the expense of democracy. And that approach failed.


quote:
If the United States has any hope of nurturing political reform in the Arab world, it must support an impartial judiciary, civil society movements and a free press – the institutions that help democracy thrive.


So the terrorists want Democracy? Yes, a government controlled by the Taliban or ISIS will unleash freedom on their people and be the standard for promoting human rights, is that it? We got rid of a strong man in Iraq and Libya...everything must be great there now right?

The philosophy laid out in the piece may've worked decades ago had the US not become so involved in the affairs and governments of these middle east countries, but the genie is out of the bottle now.

Maybe the Saudi's shouldn't be viewed as friends, but I do see them as partners against common enemies.

 

Ultimate Peach



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  posted on 5/23/2017 at 07:51 PM
I thought the Saudi Trip was handled beautifully. The speech was excellent, both on delivery and content, the posture of the President was on-point. Translation: Projecting American strength and not weakness (see BHO Saudi Trip in 2012?).

On the arms deal: Its a win for American companies and economic measures. It also signals that they have a positive relationship with America. This is good, we cant have all Muslim nations despising us and lets see where this good start takes us with helping Trump move his agenda forward.

 

____________________

 

Extreme Peach



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  posted on 5/23/2017 at 08:13 PM
quote:

You know at the time this was going on yesterday there was the story about Notre Dame graduates walking out on VP Pence at their commencement. I found it ironic, here is President Trump addressing foreign leaders of Muslim nations, and they sat there, out of respect for their country and perhaps respect for the USA and listened to a man they have seen painted as a liar and hostile towards their faith. Contrast that with South Bend Indiana you have kids thinking they don't have to listen to somebody with whom they disagree or question and disrespect the US Vice President, their Vice President and walk out. I was that immature once as well, glad I grew up.



Last time I checked nebish, this was still a "free" country and these young people don't "have to listen" to anybody? In fact, many people would consider these young folks refusing to pay respect to a criminal, corrupt and greed based administration, an act of courage and patriotism..........joe....PS pretty sure these "respectful" Arabs actually don't respect much else besides money.

 

World Class Peach



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  posted on 5/23/2017 at 09:50 PM
quote:
On the arms deal: Its a win for American companies and economic measures. It also signals that they have a positive relationship with America. This is good, we cant have all Muslim nations despising us and lets see where this good start takes us with helping Trump move his agenda forward.


Well, I respect your right to show loyalty and support for the Saudis - let's just forget the whole 9/11 thing. Who cares that 15 out of the 19 were Saudi and the Bin Ladens are Saudi - we can't have all Muslim nations despising us. At the end of the day, you give more praise to the Saudis and the Russians than you do some Americans. You can't say that about liberals, comrade.

 

True Peach



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  posted on 5/23/2017 at 11:41 PM
quote:
I thought the Saudi Trip was handled beautifully. The speech was excellent, both on delivery and content, the posture of the President was on-point. Translation: Projecting American strength and not weakness (see BHO Saudi Trip in 2012?).

On the arms deal: Its a win for American companies and economic measures. It also signals that they have a positive relationship with America. This is good, we cant have all Muslim nations despising us and lets see where this good start takes us with helping Trump move his agenda forward.


So........ You are a terrorist sympathizer?

 

Maximum Peach



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  posted on 5/24/2017 at 06:50 AM
quote:
quote:

You know at the time this was going on yesterday there was the story about Notre Dame graduates walking out on VP Pence at their commencement. I found it ironic, here is President Trump addressing foreign leaders of Muslim nations, and they sat there, out of respect for their country and perhaps respect for the USA and listened to a man they have seen painted as a liar and hostile towards their faith. Contrast that with South Bend Indiana you have kids thinking they don't have to listen to somebody with whom they disagree or question and disrespect the US Vice President, their Vice President and walk out. I was that immature once as well, glad I grew up.



Last time I checked nebish, this was still a "free" country and these young people don't "have to listen" to anybody? In fact, many people would consider these young folks refusing to pay respect to a criminal, corrupt and greed based administration, an act of courage and patriotism..........joe....PS pretty sure these "respectful" Arabs actually don't respect much else besides money.


As it should be.

We don't have to do anything. We don't have to dress a certain way at a wedding or funeral. We don't have to stand for the national anthem at sporting events. We don't have to hold the door open for others. We don't have to do alot of things. But many do them out of general decorum.

When these students go on in their careers and have to attend a conference or be in the presence of a guest speaker who they have different views then, will they walk out? When they are sitting across the desk from their boss being lectured on how to properly do their job, will they walk out? If their future takes them to government and they must interact with people politically opposed to them, will they walk out?

 

Zen Peach



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  posted on 5/24/2017 at 07:09 AM
quote:
When these students go on in their careers and have to attend a conference or be in the presence of a guest speaker who they have different views then, will they walk out?


Actually, people walk out of those kinds of speeches all the time. The smart person takes the other choice and skips the whole thing to begin with.

quote:
When they are sitting across the desk from their boss being lectured on how to properly do their job, will they walk out?


Let's certainly hope not. This kind of thing is quite the detriment to our society. I will say this...I was in a meeting not too long ago and in the middle of an in-over-her-head-just-graduated-with-her-masters-degree-last-year manager trying to lecture other departments on how they should to their jobs, the one senior VP in the room said "I'm not listening to this," got up, and walked out. That VP? She's 62.

quote:
If their future takes them to government and they must interact with people politically opposed to them, will they walk out?


There needs to be more walking out in government. What we've managed to rationalize as normal has gotten completely insane.

 

____________________
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