Thread: Santuary Record label closing in the U.S.

rollingcrowe - 4/7/2007 at 01:32 PM

NEW YORK (Billboard) - British independent music company Sanctuary Group will wind down the majority of the operations at its U.S. label this summer, according to a source within the company.

However, it will continue to run its catalog, licensing and new media operations. U.K. executives arrived in New York last Thursday and told Sanctuary Records staffers that they would cut operations by June 30, according to a source at the label.

The label will still work on current records, as well as those coming to market, like former Cranberries singer Dolores O'Riordan's solo debut "Are You Listening?," which is due out May 15.

"It is important to do the right things for albums like those," says one source. "But then everyone who deals with front-line will be leaving at various times over the new few months," including marketing, publicity and most sales personnel.

Meanwhile, the catalog, licensing, and new media department and certain back-office functions will remain staffed in the U.S. going forward.

The label is also home to artists such as Morrissey, Widespread Panic, Motorhead and Idlewild.


cleaneduphippy - 4/7/2007 at 02:40 PM

Hmmm, this might be a reason why the ABB is not making a new CD. I'm sure they wouldn't want to spend the money to make a CD, then license it to Sanctuary Record, just to see the company fold. Certainly don't expect the ABB to start their own record company as distibution cost would put it in the "red" in a hurry and at this late point in their career can't see them signing a licensing deal with another company.


CanadianMule - 4/7/2007 at 04:47 PM

I have been writing about this situation for about two years when people discuss the ABB and new releases.

The label is full of older acts and "metal" bands from the 80s-90s. Some real great artists are on their label. Partly because most other "majors" wouldn't touch them. Santuary's belief was that they may not sell huge numbers anymore (million or more) but these bands have loyal followings. Plus maybe the odd act could have a huge hit in them again. I think they found out that although people go see these bands on summer tours, they don't buy the albums. Look at the ABB for instance, HTN is a great album. People can debate about how it compares to previous albums but the concensus has always been that it is very solid. It sales pale in comparison to the number of people who attended the tour that summer. The truth is that there are still people at shows that have no idea what songs these are. The die-hards (like people on here) are a very small percentage of the people at shows.

We may all want another studio album but the truth is that there is no demand for it from a business perspective. Sales of HTN were a clear indicator of that.

The ABB's best bet is too continue with the ILs and the Archieve releases. The are far too seasoned to try the indie route. Too much effort, time and money for little result. Makes no sense.


fschiazza - 4/7/2007 at 05:02 PM

No mater what, some label will give the Allmans a chance at making a new record. No matter what.

The reason for the lack of a new album has nothing to do with the label, and everything to do with the band having no new material.


cleaneduphippy - 4/7/2007 at 05:19 PM

quote:
No mater what, some label will give the Allmans a chance at making a new record. No matter what.

The reason for the lack of a new album has nothing to do with the label, and everything to do with the band having no new material.



Some people around here need to take a Business 101 course. Of course, some label would be willing to sign them, but it would be a smaller, independent with limited distribution, and I don't think the ABB is interested in going that route. Hell, I remember the Billboard magazine that came out in the late '90s which was basically a resume for the band looking for a record deal. Their record company at time Epic (which was owned by Sony) didn't even run an ad for the band there. Eventually, the best deal the band could find was to record themselves (that was because at least they "owned" the masters) and license it to Santuary for distribution. Hate to say it, but I think HTN may be the last studio ABB, and what we'll see in the future are ILs and Archieve releases.

[Edited on 4/7/2007 by cleaneduphippy]


finsky - 4/7/2007 at 05:30 PM

fsciazza, it's obvious where you are going with this.

Even if GA & the ABB had new songs & material for a new album, it's not going to be worth the effort with the current state of the music industry. Why should they even consider going through a smaller label? It won't make any $$$. I have to agree & say HTN may very well be the last ABB studio album we will see.


CanadianMule - 4/7/2007 at 06:25 PM

quote:
No mater what, some label will give the Allmans a chance at making a new record. No matter what.

The reason for the lack of a new album has nothing to do with the label, and everything to do with the band having no new material.


Or the desire to. At this point, it really doesn't serve their purpose or seem to be a priority to anyone in the band.

As for "some" label signing them Sure "some" label would but a small label that would not really put any money up which would be the reason anyway. Major labels would all pass. You may think it has nothing to do with a label but you are wrong. Who is going to pay for the recording costs? The ABB themselves and then shop it around? Not a chance that they would take the risk when they know their sales patterns and the interest from the industry. Some may not like it but don't expect these guys to just throw money away because a handful of fans want a new album. Not realistic.


DarylM - 4/8/2007 at 02:00 AM

Well, Warren and his Mule don't seem to have any problem
recording and releasing new product.....would a Gov't Mule
disc outsell a new ABB recording? I don't know....couldn't
the Allmans record a CD and then license it to Dave Matthews
label, for example....we'll get a new disc, it's just a matter of
how many more years we'll have to wait.


jszfunk - 4/8/2007 at 11:25 AM

quote:
quote:
No mater what, some label will give the Allmans a chance at making a new record. No matter what.

The reason for the lack of a new album has nothing to do with the label, and everything to do with the band having no new material.



Some people around here need to take a Business 101 course. Of course, some label would be willing to sign them, but it would be a smaller, independent with limited distribution, and I don't think the ABB is interested in going that route. Hell, I remember the Billboard magazine that came out in the late '90s which was basically a resume for the band looking for a record deal. Their record company at time Epic (which was owned by Sony) didn't even run an ad for the band there. Eventually, the best deal the band could find was to record themselves (that was because at least they "owned" the masters) and license it to Santuary for distribution. Hate to say it, but I think HTN may be the last studio ABB, and what we'll see in the future are ILs and Archieve releases.

[Edited on 4/7/2007 by cleaneduphippy]



I understand everyone's point on here...but how many archive sereis can you release with out beating Whipping post,Dreams and the others into the ground? Yes those are great songs but how many times can you repeat a core group of songs? I know the die hards will beat me down on this. I can understand if the song is a little different or a specail guest is on there , but lets be real. The set lists are getting kinda redundant. Yes they rotate it and mix it up, but it is nothing new and fresh unless they do the song different or have a guest on it. They probably could use there catalog a little more than what they do, IMHO.

Now about releasing new material. I do understand the business end that everyone explained and I agree. But what about just recording new material just for interent downloading only from this website or another one? You could purchase the whole album or buy single tracks. I think Jimmy Page and the Crowes did that at first when they released there live one and I think the Who did it . What will be the cost in that?
I want new tunes just as much and the talent is there to do it . I know everyone is busy with their other bands, but it is possible to come up with some new songs.
Hell, a good part of HTN were songs that were written in the past or covered, So there was not that much new material even on that.
I know this may piss some people off, but I really do not want to go through another 9 year period without new songs.


cleaneduphippy - 4/8/2007 at 01:11 PM

quote:
Now about releasing new material. I do understand the business end that everyone explained and I agree. But what about just recording new material just for interent downloading only from this website or another one? You could purchase the whole album or buy single tracks.



First of all, the ABB is a LEGACY band, and at this point in their career they don't have to record and the vast majority of their fans don't really want a new CD or new songs.

Second, the ABB has made it clear several times they're not interested in doing downloads of their songs, and besides why make a CD if people are going to pick it apart for certain songs? Defeats the whole purpose of making a CD.

Third, for the band to go and record new material, means that all the members of the band have to be available for the recording. Considering that when the ABB is not actively touring, usually Govt Mule, dTb, Oteil and the Peacemakers, or Gregg Allman and Friends ARE touring and/or recording for their individual bands, so that makes getting everybody together for a recording session very difficult. btw, the ABB are "old school" in the sense, that they don't believe in people recording their parts at different times in different studios, they instead prefer to record "live" in the studio, with maybe Gregg, going back to re-do his vocals, and maybe Warren and/or Derek maybe redoing a guitar part here or there. But for the most part, the recording is a "live in studio" recording.

Also, the ABB like to record to an analog media (tape) instead of a digital media, making finding a recording studio that still records this way that much more difficult to find. If you listen to the interviews on the Tom Dowd documentary, Gregg says Tom used to call them "analog a$$holes", because of this fact. Truth is, the ABB themselves for the most part is not all that big on the Internet and digital recording (exception the ILs). People need to remember in a lot of ways the ABB are still "old school" musicians.


[Edited on 4/8/2007 by cleaneduphippy]


rollingcrowe - 4/8/2007 at 01:43 PM

If they ever do decide to record a new album I would jump at the chance to purchase it even if it was just half as good as HTN. I love that album!


jszfunk - 4/8/2007 at 08:58 PM

quote:
quote:
Now about releasing new material. I do understand the business end that everyone explained and I agree. But what about just recording new material just for interent downloading only from this website or another one? You could purchase the whole album or buy single tracks.



First of all, the ABB is a LEGACY band, and at this point in their career they don't have to record and the vast majority of their fans don't really want a new CD or new songs.

Second, the ABB has made it clear several times they're not interested in doing downloads of their songs, and besides why make a CD if people are going to pick it apart for certain songs? Defeats the whole purpose of making a CD.

Third, for the band to go and record new material, means that all the members of the band have to be available for the recording. Considering that when the ABB is not actively touring, usually Govt Mule, dTb, Oteil and the Peacemakers, or Gregg Allman and Friends ARE touring and/or recording for their individual bands, so that makes getting everybody together for a recording session very difficult. btw, the ABB are "old school" in the sense, that they don't believe in people recording their parts at different times in different studios, they instead prefer to record "live" in the studio, with maybe Gregg, going back to re-do his vocals, and maybe Warren and/or Derek maybe redoing a guitar part here or there. But for the most part, the recording is a "live in studio" recording.

Also, the ABB like to record to an analog media (tape) instead of a digital media, making finding a recording studio that still records this way that much more difficult to find. If you listen to the interviews on the Tom Dowd documentary, Gregg says Tom used to call them "analog a$$holes", because of this fact. Truth is, the ABB themselves for the most part is not all that big on the Internet and digital recording (exception the ILs). People need to remember in a lot of ways the ABB are still "old school" musicians.


[Edited on 4/8/2007 by cleaneduphippy]


WOW... That' s pretty interesting what you said :"the vast majority of their fans don't really want a new CD or new songs"..
I think you might want to speak for yourself on that one.

"besides why make a CD if people are going to pick it apart for certain songs? Defeats the whole purpose of making a CD. "

I never said make a CD. Just record some new songs and make them available for dowloading. What does that hurt? I think just about every other artist has music out there to pick apart and downlaod, and that really does not defeat any purpose of doing a CD because you are not making one.

People need to remember in a lot of ways the ABB are still "old school" musicians.

I think Butch is pretty progressive in a sense he tried Moogis, which flopped though.


Buppalo1 - 4/9/2007 at 03:33 PM

There's a new star rising in the South, people who have been there, done that, and who comprehend the current state of the record business.

But one thing's for sure.....business is business. Trade free shows all you want--but if you don't support commercial releases financially, there will be no commercial releases. It's up to us.


phillybob - 4/9/2007 at 04:02 PM

If that was the last record it will be a shame. They need to take the time as a BAND and do one especially with some contributions from Derek. Gregg, Warren, Derek and Oteil can all write its getting them in the same room.

I am sure Hitten the Note still sold more copies than anything any of the others have put out seperately.

Pressing records for anyone like the old days is just not profitable anymore with the exception of the top 5% of acts.

Butch had mentioned before the Beacon that Gregg and Warren were supposed to get together and write ohh well.


slowhand6 - 4/9/2007 at 04:13 PM

Y'know- they have recorded new material & are selling lots of it. Instant Live has any & all new material & released all of the dates, with the exception of a few, every year since HTN was released. I don't know if they make money off of it. But they are making money off of the shows they play. And if IL draws more crowd beacuse they know they can get a copy of that show right away then the band has made more money.

The recording industry has evolved at breakneck speed & this is the result. If you want to hear new material you are better off catching a show, or an IL, or even an audience recording. I never bought HTN, have debated changing that, but know that I really won't listne to it all that much. For the recording industry the money is now in the reissues, which I do buy, offer much more than they used to, incl art, dissertations about the album, & a bonus live or studio outtake disc (usually).

You have to remind yourself in these types of conversations that the industry profited for decades, then chose to fight the change rather than reinvest itself to survive. I say good riddance.


cleaneduphippy - 4/9/2007 at 05:18 PM

The thing about HTN is that it didn't sell all that well. Got a lot of good reviews, the band "road-tested" most of the songs on the CD for two summers to build interest in the CD. And what happen? The CD was released and it did OK in sales for about the 1st month, and then after, the sales dropped like a rock. The best it charted on Billboard was 37 and I don't think it even went (or even got close) to going "Gold". The live release "One Way Out" only got to 190 on Billboard. Now with that happening with your last release, would it make financial sense to put out a new CD? For the ABB that means everybody got to clear their schedule for at least a month (loss revenue for Warren, Derek and Oteil because their individual bands aren't touring), then book a studio, engineer, producer, provide hotel and food for the band while recording and mixing the CD (and remember that the ABB is paying for all this out of it's "own pocket"). In addition, you got to arrange for artwork and graphics for the CD itself (more band money spent), and when all that's done, hopefully be able to find a record company that you can "lease" this recording to (the ABB does this nowadays to be able to "own" the rights to their own recordings, a situation that they DON'T have with their Capricorn recording) to do the distribution, and HOPE that you make enought sales to at least "break even" on this project. Now remember, not many radio stations are going to play anything "new" by the ABB, many of the stores that used to sell your CDs in the past are no longer in businesses, and in addition, the band itself probably doesn't want to tour to extent necessary to promote the CD (and even with that, that's "iffy", wonder how many of the "new" Stones and Eric Clapton CDs got sold because they toured). Now with all that in mind, would it make any sense to spend that money (and possibly not even break even) on a studio CD, or would it make more sense to do what has always been a proven money-maker for the band and that is to tour and do "live shows"? Try to take the perspective of the band and it's management before you give an answer.

quote:
Butch had mentioned before the Beacon that Gregg and Warren were supposed to get together and write ohh well.



That's another reason, I don't think you'll see a studio CD. If Gregg and Warren had written some good songs for the ABB, don't you think that at least three or four of them would have been played at this last Beacon run and be "road tested" this summer? If that had happen I would say that maybe the band would do a new CD. But the band DIDN'T play any new material at the Beacon (beyond some "covers"), so that kind of tell you not to be expecting a new studio CD anytime soon.

The way I understand it, if anybody is going to record a new CD it will be Derek Trucks. No doubt, his record company (Columbia) would love for him and dTb to get back in the studio ASAP and come out with some new material and new CD that they could tour behind and capitalize on Derek's time spend with Eric Clapton and the fans he made at those shows. And I expect that what Derek will do, once the ABB summer tour is over.


[Edited on 4/9/2007 by cleaneduphippy]


rottinpeach - 4/9/2007 at 05:44 PM

Dont give up yet. Where their is a mountain, folks will climb it. If there is a river, folks will paddle it. If you build it, people will come. If the ABB records new stuff, someone will distribute it. Look at all the crap record companies are distributing now. Business is nothing but taking a chance. I am sure their are folks out there who will take that chance. The Allmans have done things ahead of their time, like this website, (almost) Moogies. In time there will be a new avenue in distribution, its under our nose right now.

I haven't bought a CD from a retail outlet in a couple of years. Retail outlet being, one that I would walk into and purchase. I have purchased online. They make IL's only available at shows or HTN, why couldnt they just offer the new stuff online as downloads. Its eventually going to be all downloads in a few years. The music will keep coming, only the method of obtaining it will change.



If your a fan of the ABB, I would think you would not hesitate buying their new CD. I could care less where it came from.

[Edited on 4/9/2007 by rottinpeach]


Buppalo1 - 4/9/2007 at 06:01 PM

CUH, you made some great points. But if there was a way that most of your objections could be addressed.....?

Bottom line is and always be, business is business. Just like you said. Everybody involved has to have a reasonable expectation of making $$$, else there's no point in the effort.

Sometimes in life, when one door closes, another one opens. Nice post, well thought-out.


leftyblues - 4/9/2007 at 06:07 PM

quote:
But one thing's for sure.....business is business. Trade free shows all you want--but if you don't support commercial releases financially, there will be no commercial releases. It's up to us.



bam..you got it...

here is the reality..you have to buy releases to keep the industry afloat..if you don't , you won't have all that many releases, and that is where we are now...the indusrty is dying because of greed...sometimes on the part of the labels and sometimes on the part of consumers, that burn and tape music illeagally..


slowhand6 - 4/9/2007 at 06:19 PM

quote:
quote:
But one thing's for sure.....business is business. Trade free shows all you want--but if you don't support commercial releases financially, there will be no commercial releases. It's up to us.



bam..you got it...

here is the reality..you have to buy releases to keep the industry afloat..if you don't , you won't have all that many releases, and that is where we are now...the indusrty is dying because of greed...sometimes on the part of the labels and sometimes on the part of consumers, that burn and tape music illeagally..


but isn't there a difference between participating in legal music trading & choosing to let the industry die from years of their greed (at the expense of the artists), and sharing music illegally at the expense of the artist for lack of royalty?

I am perfectly content with listening to live music- Instant Lives purchased & legally-made audience recordings. If there was never a studio-recorded album made again I would not be harmed nor fouled.


leftyblues - 4/9/2007 at 06:36 PM

quote:
But one thing's for sure.....business is business. Trade free shows all you want--but if you don't support commercial releases financially, there will be no commercial releases. It's up to us.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------- -----



bam..you got it...

here is the reality..you have to buy releases to keep the industry afloat..if you don't , you won't have all that many releases, and that is where we are now...the indusrty is dying because of greed...sometimes on the part of the labels and sometimes on the part of consumers, that burn and tape music illeagally..
--------------------------------------------------------------------------- -----



but isn't there a difference between participating in legal music trading & choosing to let the industry die from years of their greed (at the expense of the artists), and sharing music illegally at the expense of the artist for lack of royalty?

I am perfectly content with listening to live music- Instant Lives purchased & legally-made audience recordings. If there was never a studio-recorded album made again I would not be harmed nor fouled.


that's not what i am talking about....legally allowed recording is one thing...but even with that, don't you think a band that gives you that privledge deserves your support on studio releases ?

take Hittin The Note for example...what did it cost 15 dollars ?

how many free ABB shows do we all have ? Factor in all the free music we get , then divide it all into 15 dollars...I think that is one hell of a bargain and it helps the band know they make the right call in allowing taping... That money helps support the band members..


Buppalo1 - 4/9/2007 at 06:43 PM

Exactly, IMHO. Commercial releases support the overall effort--the reason for the band to exist in the first place. If there's no money in it, why not just sell cars or drive a truck or get into the insurance business?

In the end, we get what we are willing to pay for. This is the nature of free markets.
It's like gravity. It's just the way it is.


slowhand6 - 4/9/2007 at 06:46 PM

quote:
quote:
But one thing's for sure.....business is business. Trade free shows all you want--but if you don't support commercial releases financially, there will be no commercial releases. It's up to us.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------- -----



bam..you got it...

here is the reality..you have to buy releases to keep the industry afloat..if you don't , you won't have all that many releases, and that is where we are now...the indusrty is dying because of greed...sometimes on the part of the labels and sometimes on the part of consumers, that burn and tape music illeagally..
--------------------------------------------------------------------------- -----



but isn't there a difference between participating in legal music trading & choosing to let the industry die from years of their greed (at the expense of the artists), and sharing music illegally at the expense of the artist for lack of royalty?

I am perfectly content with listening to live music- Instant Lives purchased & legally-made audience recordings. If there was never a studio-recorded album made again I would not be harmed nor fouled.


that's not what i am talking about....legally allowed recording is one thing...but even with that, don't you think a band that gives you that privledge deserves your support on studio releases ?

take Hittin The Note for example...what did it cost 15 dollars ?

how many free ABB shows do we all have ? Factor in all the free music we get , then divide it all into 15 dollars...I think that is one hell of a bargain and it helps the band know they make the right call in allowing taping... That money helps support the band members..


Lefty, Point well taken. But if you take the studio releases out of it then you are left with nothing but playing live. And recording live shows has become an industry unto itself. Maybe there is effort to be spent in the band defining the terms of their cut in IL's rather than looking at doing a new stuido project.

It would be interesting to break down the price of a concert ticket & see how much the band gets, then juxtapose those numbers with those of a studio album. Usually royalties & residual sales are the meat & potatoes. But HTN doesn't seem to be getting any air play, commercial use or residual retail sales.

Interesting topic & segue. See you at Wanee Lefty! I swear I'll be a lot nicer this time!


slowhand6 - 4/9/2007 at 06:47 PM

Sorry. One more thing. Whatever happened to making music for the sake of making music?


leftyblues - 4/9/2007 at 08:10 PM

quote:
Sorry. One more thing. Whatever happened to making music for the sake of making music?


i don't want to be mean but when you get up each day and do your job for free, then you can make that statement..


quote:
quote:
--------------------------------------------------------------------------- -----
But one thing's for sure.....business is business. Trade free shows all you want--but if you don't support commercial releases financially, there will be no commercial releases. It's up to us.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------- -----



bam..you got it...

here is the reality..you have to buy releases to keep the industry afloat..if you don't , you won't have all that many releases, and that is where we are now...the indusrty is dying because of greed...sometimes on the part of the labels and sometimes on the part of consumers, that burn and tape music illeagally..
--------------------------------------------------------------------------- -----



but isn't there a difference between participating in legal music trading & choosing to let the industry die from years of their greed (at the expense of the artists), and sharing music illegally at the expense of the artist for lack of royalty?

I am perfectly content with listening to live music- Instant Lives purchased & legally-made audience recordings. If there was never a studio-recorded album made again I would not be harmed nor fouled.
--------------------------------------------------------------------------- -----



that's not what i am talking about....legally allowed recording is one thing...but even with that, don't you think a band that gives you that privledge deserves your support on studio releases ?

take Hittin The Note for example...what did it cost 15 dollars ?

how many free ABB shows do we all have ? Factor in all the free music we get , then divide it all into 15 dollars...I think that is one hell of a bargain and it helps the band know they make the right call in allowing taping... That money helps support the band members..
--------------------------------------------------------------------------- -----



Lefty, Point well taken. But if you take the studio releases out of it then you are left with nothing but playing live. And recording live shows has become an industry unto itself. Maybe there is effort to be spent in the band defining the terms of their cut in IL's rather than looking at doing a new stuido project.

It would be interesting to break down the price of a concert ticket & see how much the band gets, then juxtapose those numbers with those of a studio album. Usually royalties & residual sales are the meat & potatoes. But HTN doesn't seem to be getting any air play, commercial use or residual retail sales.



but bro, the studio releases are in the mix...the making music for free thing is a great concept..if gas ,studios, transportation, roadies, producers, food, hotels, insurance, instruments, amps, hall rentals, and all of the things that go along with producing a show that i have not listed, were free, then we could talk....

quote:
Interesting topic & segue. See you at Wanee Lefty! I swear I'll be a lot nicer this time!


LOL...it's all good bro...


hotlantatim - 4/9/2007 at 09:03 PM

Where It All Begins went Gold in 1997 (500,000+ copies sold in US). I never saw the totals for Hittin the Note but it sold 37K in the first week and has now been out for 4 years.

I bet it has sold 200K which is enough for a label to be interested AND make some money for everyone. The Beacon DVD went platinum in just a few months, which I believe is 50,000 sold. HTN was not released on a major label so I believe it would have done even better had been release on one. Either way, a major distributor would certainly be involved in a new album even if a major label wasn't.

My point in the above is that let's don't kid ourselves about HTN cd. I'm sure it hit the targets and expectations of those involved. I also believe a major label would take on the Allman Brothers (considering their off-shoots like dTb are on major labels).

I may be able to actually find out sales totals from a friend in the distribution business...


cleaneduphippy - 4/9/2007 at 09:25 PM

At this point in time, I think the ABB (Gregg, Jaimoe and Butch) are contend to make it to 2009 (the 40th anniversary of the founding of the ABB) and then gracefully retire the ABB. Warren and Derek are at the point with their bands (Govt Mule and dTb) that if they want to take it to the next level they got to focus on doing just that, and I think the rest of the ABB understands their need to do so, and unfortunately, you may see one or the other or even both leaving the ABB in the next year or two (all on good terms, of course). We'll get a summer tour this year and maybe next. Beyond that it'll be the Beacon run and Wanee. As for a studio CD, don't see it happening, as Warren needs to concentrate on the Mule and Derek on the dTb, as that really is the future and the continuing legacy of the ABB. I've been following the band since 1970 (Love Valley, first show) and you know there are not a lot of bands that have done what the ABB have done for as long as they been doing it. They really have, by and large, kept their musical standards up all these years, not a lot of bands can say that. And if the "old dogs" want to lay up on the porch, and face it, not many want to be "road dogs" after the age of 60, they've certainly earned the right. Appreciate what you've gotten from these guys, if you get any more, consider it a bonus.


leftyblues - 4/9/2007 at 09:28 PM

quote:
you know there are not a lot of bands that have done what the ABB have done for as long as they been doing it. They really have, by and large, kept their musical standards up all these years, not a lot of bands can say that. And if the "old dogs" want to lay up on the porch, and face it, not many want to be "road dogs" after the age of 60, they've certainly earned the right. Appreciate what you've gotten from these guys, if you get any more, consider it a bonus.


I agree...these guys have set the bar VERY high


johnwott - 4/9/2007 at 10:24 PM

Dang

Some of my favorite bands are on Sanctuary


Butch should snatch up all these band for Flying Frog Records


This thread come from : Hittin' The Web with the Allman Brothers Band
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